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Pirouette : The presentations from Jayden Brown on Inside a Novice Training….

Bridle Bijoux - Silver & Ruby Horses-store.comPirouette : The presentations from Jayden Brown on Inside a Novice Training….

Mt Gravatt District Horse and Pony Club Volume 5, Issue 7 – July, 2012 he QLD Festival of Dressage is over again for another year!It was a fantastic (and long!) day and I wouldn’t hesitate in encouraging anyone to come along next year.

The presentations from Jayden Brown on “Inside a Novice Training Session” and QLD State Coach Carlos de Cleermaecker on “Developing the Canter Pirouette” were particularly insightful.

Shane and Mattea Davidson also presented “Dressage Training to Improve Jumping Technique” (see even the pro’s agree you can’t jump without a foundation in dressage!!) which varied the long day in the indoor.

The trade stalls, seminar centre and endless hilarious performances by Harold the Horse (see video on Facebook) were also thoroughly entertaining and it was great to have a day out surrounded by fellow horse enthusiasts.

Don’t forget to find a Foxtel friend if you don’t have it at home to cheer on the Aussie equestrians! Happy riding! T Jessy e: j.salesluis@hotmail.com m: 0431 748 204 EVENT NOMINATIONS: Cathi Collier – ccollier2@bigpond.com Kathy Wade – kathy@rkwade.com.au CHIEF INSTRUCTOR: Sarah Weiss – 0401 825 211 MGDHPC: Prebble Street, Rochedale QLD www.mtgravattponyclub.com Add us on Facebook – click here!

Read more about Pirouette : The presentations from Jayden Brown on Inside a Novice Training….:

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    Horses-Store.com and Pirouette : The presentations from Jayden Brown on Inside a Novice Training….

    Horses-Store.com - Pirouette : The presentations from Jayden Brown on Inside a Novice Training….

    Horses-Store.com and Pirouette : The presentations from Jayden Brown on Inside a Novice Training….

    Horses-Store.com - Pirouette : The presentations from Jayden Brown on Inside a Novice Training….

    Draft Horse : This unit of measure is equal to the power exerted….

    Equestrian Concierge Conditioner travel pack Horses-store.comDraft Horse : This unit of measure is equal to the power exerted….

    The first sight of Scythians warriors on horseback may have inspired ancient Greek myths about half-man, half-horse creatures called centaurs. Japanese samurai and European knights had a lot in common: they were elite warriors who rode horses, wore armour, came from the upper class, and followed an official code of honour, loyalty, bravery and military skill.

    In Europe, these ideals were called chivalry (from cheval, French for horse).

    In Japan, they were known as Kyuba no michi, or the “Way of Horse and Bow.” A medieval knight’s horse had to be strong enough to carry not only a rider and his weighty weapons into battle, but also 46 kg (101 pounds) of protective steel armour for both man and steed. People have at one time or other harnessed horse power to pull almost every vehicle imaginable, along with other heavy items: chariots, sleds, buggies, plows, stagecoaches, wagons, cannons, barges, ambulances, fire engines, felled trees, and streetcars. Contrary to their modern image as cute denizens of the petting zoo, Shetland ponies were specially bred to work in England’s coalmines.

    The pit ponies’ job was to pull carts full of coal from the coalface to the shaft, where it was lifted to the surface. Many machines were once literally propelled by horsepower.

    Horses walked on a treadmill or turned a driveshaft to pump water, thresh and grind grain, lift stone and coal, and even move paddle ships.

    James Watt invented the term “horsepower” in the 1770s to help market a new kind of steam engine.

    This unit of measure is equal to the power exerted by a draft horse lifting 330 pounds 100 feet (150 kg 30 m) in 1 minute. In 1900, around 130,000 horses worked in Manhattan, more than 10 times the number of cabs on the streets of New York City today.

    The average city horse produced up to 20 kg (44 pounds) of manure and 7.5 L (8 quarts) of urine a day. Mustangs and most other “wild” horses are feral, meaning they are descended from escaped populations of the domestic subspecies (Equus ferus caballus).

    The only true wild horse is Przewalski’s Horse (Equus ferus przewalskii), a genetically distinct, endangered subspecies found only in Mongolia.

    No other subspecies exist today. Horses are social animals.

    In the absence of equine companions, they will often befriend another animal, such as a goat or a housecat. Horses can’t gallop at top speed for very long.

    That’s why riders for the U.S.

    Pony Express mail service switched to a fresh horse every 16 km (10 miles).

    The Pony Express was far from unique — similar horse relay systems were widely used in ancient Babylonia, Persia, China, Mongolia, Egypt, Italy and France. Many older paintings and drawings show galloping horses airborne with all four legs outstretched.

    In reality, a galloping horse is airborne when its hind legs and front legs are closest together, and the hoofs touch down when its legs are extended. In Central Asia, India and the Middle East, hunters once used trained lynx and cheetahs as hunting assistants.

    The big cats learned to ride behind the hunter, on the horse’s rump, then leap down and attack when game was spotted. Bows for violins and other string instruments are made with long hairs from a horse’s tail.

    Hair from the tail or mane is also turned into paintbrushes.

    Historically, horsehair has also been used to produce wigs, fabric, thread, upholstery stuffing, hats, undergarments, shaving brushes, fishing lines and nets, sieves, pottery, and even lath and plaster walls.

    Read more about Draft Horse : This unit of measure is equal to the power exerted….:

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    Horses-Store.com and Draft Horse : This unit of measure is equal to the power exerted….

    Horses-Store.com - Draft Horse : This unit of measure is equal to the power exerted….

    Horses-Store.com and Draft Horse : This unit of measure is equal to the power exerted….

    Horses-Store.com - Draft Horse : This unit of measure is equal to the power exerted….

    Keith Bristow Class 1: SCOPE THERMOHOMES EUROPE UK 1

    Equi.Linn Sports Lingerie for women with style Horses-store.com Keith Bristow Class 1: SCOPE THERMOHOMES EUROPE UK 1

    ENTRIES WILL BE TAKEN ON THE DAY IF THERE ARE SPACES, PLEASE RING SECRETARY ON 07815 908017 or look on HYPERLINK http://www.brendonpyecombe.co.uk www.brendonpyecombe.co.uk News Page for entries updates. We would anticipate that entries for the surface arena will be full before the show and entries will be available on the day for the grass arena BUT PLEASE RING AND CHECK BEFORE TRAVELLING. FOR UP TO DATE SHOW INFORMATION ON FACEBOOK – PLEASE ‘LIKE’ OUR PAGE – Pyecombe Shows and Brendon Saddlery SOFTRACK SURFACE ARENA – THURSDAY AUGUST 4TH 8.30am Course Builder: Mr.

    Keith Bristow Class 1: SCOPE THERMOHOMES EUROPE UK 1.05m ADVENTURER CHAMP.

    QUALIFIER. DRAWN ORDER. (Tel: 07815 908017 between 5-7pm day before or check website – Telephone to check if entries being taken on day).

    For registered horses that have not won a total of £300.

    Two Phase, rule 286A.

    Speed 325mpm.

    LAST CHANCE TO QUALIFY FOR SCOPE 2011. 1st 6 to qualify, horses must jump clear in the first round and qualification will not pass down the line. .

    Eligible double clears qualify for JB Arenas Amateur Championship on Saturday. Prizes: £40 £30 £20 £15 £15 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £14 / After Closing Date: £16 Class 2: 1.10m OPEN Sponsored by D & R Pike Crane Hire Two Phase, rule 286A.

    Speed 325mpm.

    Eligible double clears qualify for JB Arenas Amateur Championship on Saturday. 1st 8 young riders qualify for South of England Young Riders Championship on Saturday. Prizes: £50 £35 £25 £20 £20 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £15 / After Closing Date: £17 Class 3: SMARTER TRANSPORT TRAINING NATIONAL 1.15M MEMBERS CUP QUALIFIER LAST CHANCE TO QUALIFY FOR SCOPE 2011.

    Two Phase, rule 286a.

    Speed 350mpm.

    For reg.

    Horses ridden by members not in the top 100 on Ranking List 339. 1st 6 to qualify, qualification does not pass down the line and horses must jump clear in first round. 1st 8 young riders qualify for South of England Young Riders Championship on Saturday.

    Eligible double clears qualify for JB Arenas Amateur Championship on Saturday. Prizes: £50 £35 £25 £20 £20 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £15 / After Closing Date: £17 Class 4: SECTION A: HORSE & HOUND FOXHUNTER [Incorp.

    Sport Horse Classic Blue Riband SECTION B: 1.20M OPEN. [Championship Qualifier] LAST CHANCE TO QUALIFY SCOPE 2011.

    Please state section on entry form.

    For reg.

    Horses.

    Rule 310, Speed 350mpm, Table A7.

    This class will be split if 30 or more starters.

    Horses may compete in one section only. 1st 8 lady riders from each section qualify for South of England Ladies Championship tomorrow. 1st 6 foxhunter horses qualify for Cushionbed British Showjumping Scope 2011 Festival, qualification does not pass down the line Prizes: £75 £55 £35 £20 £20 £20 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £18 / After Closing Date: £20 Class 5: HIGH OFFLEY STUD NATIONAL 1.30M OPEN incorp.

    Laura Tinto of HBF Equestrian 1.30m Classic. Rule 306.

    Table A7, speed 375mpm.

    For reg horses to be ridden by Adult, Associate or Pony Associate members. 1st 8 lady riders qualify for South of England Ladies Championship tomorrow.

    Qualification – Two double clears qualify for British Showjumping Scope Festival 2012.

    Riders in top 60 Ranking List 351 will not be eligible to compete in the Classic section of the Championship at the Final. Prizes: £150 £120 £85 £55 £40 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £23 / After Closing Date: £25 Classes in this arena may be changed to 2 Phase on the day if entries are full.

    Please check when walking the course. PLEASE NOTE: NEW ENTRY SYSTEM FOR 2011 Enter and Pay before the day to guarantee your entry.

    Classes will be closed when full.

    Should you not be able to attend show, please telephone/email before 9am on show day and full refunds will be given.

    Entries will be accepted on the day if space available.

    CALL 07815 908017 TO CHECK. Entries can be posted, faxed or emailed on correct entry form only please. Please note entries posted, faxed or emailed without payment details will be accepted but will be charged on the day prices, so please include cheque, credit/debit card details THURSDAY AUGUST 4TH 9am GRASS ARENA – Course Builder – Mr.

    Stuart Reeve-Young 8.00am -8.45am CLEAR ROUND. 0.85-0.90m.

    Last ticket sold at Secretary at 8.15am.

    All rounds must be jumped by 8.45am.

    No refund if not jumped by 8.45am Entry Fee: £5 Class 6: KBIS INSURANCE SENIOR BRITISH NOVICE. For reg.

    Horses ridden by Adult/Associate/Pony Associate members.

    All declarations at collecting ring by 9.15am.

    Rule 316, Two Phase – Rule 286a.

    Speed 325mpm. 1st rosette by KBIS Insurance. Prizes: £30 £20 £14 £14 £14 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £13 / After Closing Date: £15 Class 7: SCOPE KATHARINE JAMES 1M NOVICE CHAMPIONSHIP QUALIFIER. Dual qualification for Equissage Discovery.

    LAST CHANCE TO QUALIFY FOR SCOPE 2011. For reg.

    Horses ridden by Adult/Associate/Pony Associate members which have not won a total of £175.

    Two Phase, rule 286a & 314, speed 325mpm. 1st 6 to qualify for Cushionbed British Showjumping Scope Festival 2011, must jump clear in first round and qualification does not pass down the line. Sponsored by Julia and Helen Cruden Prizes: £40 £30 £20 £15 £15 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £14 / After Closing Date: £16 Class 8: 0.95M DERBY Open to reg horses.

    Single Phase with a minimum of 15 fences.

    Rule 287.

    Speed 325mpm.

    Including some natural Derby fences not exceeding 0.90m including Table, Cornish wall, Devils Dyke, Water.

    Some optional fences. Prizes: £50 £35 £30 £25 £16 £16 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £15 / After Closing Date: £17 Class 9: 1m OPEN Sponsored by Brendon Saddlery For reg.

    Horses ridden by Adult/Associate/Pony Associate members.

    Two Phase, rule 286A, speed 325mpm. Prizes: £40 £30 £20 £15 £15 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £14 / After Closing Date: £16 Class 10: 1.05m OPEN Two Phase-Rule 286a.

    Speed 325 mpm.

    For reg.

    Horses.

    Eligible double clears qualify for JB Arenas Amateur Championship on Saturday Prizes: £40 £30 £20 £15 £15 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £14 / After Closing Date: £16 Class 11: SOUTH OF ENGLAND YOUNG RIDERS QUALIFIER — Class 15: SECTION A: HORSE & HOUND FOXHUNTER SECTION B: 1.20M OPEN. Please state section on entry form.

    For reg.

    Horses ridden by Adult/Associate/Pony Associate members.

    Rule 310, Speed 350mpm, Table A7.

    This class will be split if 30 or more starters.

    Horses may compete in one section only. 1st 8 lady riders qualify for South of England Ladies Championship – next class. 1st 8 young riders qualify for South of England Young Riders Championship tomorrow from each section. Prizes: £75 £55 £35 £20 £20 £20 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £18 / After Closing Date: £20 Class 16: SOUTH OF ENGLAND LADIES CHAMPIONSHIP Sponsored by D & D Construction For previously qualified reg.

    Lady rider/horse combinations.

    Table A7, speed 350mpm, Track approx. 1.20/1.25m.

    List with secretary.

    The Stanley Powell Memorial Trophy and show rug will be awarded to the winner.competitors that only qualify yesterday or today entry fee £25. Prizes: £150 £100 £70 £50 £30 £25 £25 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £23 / After Closing Date £25 Class 17: CUSHIONBED NATIONAL 1.40M OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP QUALIFIER Rule 301.

    Table A10, speed 375mpm.

    For reg horses to be ridden by Adult, Associate or Pony Associate members.

    Qualification – Two double clears qualify for British Showjumping Scope Festival 2012 Prizes: £300 £235 £170 £120 £75 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £28 / After Closing Date: £30 THE ORGANISERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO ALLOW A CLASS SPONSOR TO JUMP A WILD CARD IN THEIR OWN CHAMPIONSHIP CLASS JB ARENAS Design & build all-weather Arenas & Gallops in sand or woodchip and all synthetic surfaces…competitive prices….built to your requirements…satisfaction guaranteed.

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    Long established family business. 14, Church Road, Burgess Hill. 01444 232237 FRIDAY AUGUST 5TH GRASS ARENA – 9.00am 8.00am -8.45am CLEAR ROUND. 0.85-0.90m.

    Last ticket sold at Secretary at 8.15am.

    All rounds must be jumped by 8.45am.

    No refund if not jumped by 8.45am Entry Fee: £5 — Class 25: EQUESTRIANCLEARANCE.COM NEWCOMERS Rule 312.

    Table A7.

    Speed 325mpm.

    For reg.

    Horses ridden by Adult/Associate/Pony Associate members. 1st rosette sponsored by Equestrianclearance.com Prizes: £50 £35 £25 £20 £20 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £15 / After Closing Date: £17 Class 26: 1.15M OPEN Sponsored by The Leonardo Collection Table A4.

    Speed 350mpm.

    For reg.

    Horses ridden by Adult/Associate/Pony Associate members. 1st 8 young riders qualify for South of England Young Riders Championship later today.. Prizes: £60 £45 £30 £25 £20 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £16 / After Closing Date: £18 Class 27: HIGH OFFLEY STUD NATIONAL 1.30M OPEN incorp.

    Laura Tinto of HBF Equestrian 1.30m Classic.

    Sponsored by British Showjumping Area 46 Rule 306.

    Table A7, speed 375mpm.

    For reg horses to be ridden by Adult/Associate/Pony Associate members.

    Qualification – Two double clears qualify for British Showjumping Scope Festival 2012.

    Riders in top 60 Ranking List 351 will not be eligible to compete in the Classic section of the Championship at the Final.

    Sussex Area Open Championship Series; Last in the series, final chance to get points! Please see Sussex Area website for confirmation of rules & qualifying dates.

    Points will be awarded to prize winners determine the Sussex Area Open Champion who will receive £250, The Sussex Area Open Champion Trophy & Rug. Prizes: £150 £120 £85 £55 £40 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £23 / After Closing Date: £25 Class 28: SOUTH OF ENGLAND STONER JEWELLERS YOUNG RIDERS CHAMPIONSHIP For previously qualified reg.

    Horse/rider combinations.

    Table A7, speed 350mpm.

    Track 1.15m approx to include water tray and combination.

    List with secretary.

    Challenge Trophy & Show Sheet to the winner. Sponsored by Stoner Jewellers Prizes: £100 £75 £45 £35 £25 £20 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £18 / After Closing Date: £20 — SURFACE ARENA SUNDAY AUGUST 7th 8.30am CLASS 35 & 36 MUST BE PRE-ENTERED Senior Second Round qualifiers will be Pre-entry and Drawn Order, along with the first warm up class of the day.

    Please note separate closing date for these classes – details on schedule by each class. However, entries may possibly be accepted for Classes 35 and 36 on the day before 8am, providing that pre-entries for each class are less than 60.

    Any entries taken on the day must compete first in the drawn order.

    If over 60 entries in a class before 8am show day no entries for these specific classes will be taken on the day Class 35: SANDROCK 1.10M OPEN Sponsored by Mr. & Mrs.

    Thompson DRAWN ORDER – MUST BE PRE-ENTERED BY 2pm DAY BEFORE. (Tel: 07815 908017 between 5-7pm day before for order and on website.) Two Phase.

    Rule 286A, Speed 325mpm.

    For reg.

    Horses.

    Sandrock Trophy to winner Prizes: £50 £35 £25 £20 £20 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £15 / After Closing Date: £17 Class 36: EQUESTRIANCLEARANCE.COM NEWCOMERS 2ND ROUND DRAWN ORDER – MUST BE PRE-ENTERED BY 2pm DAY BEFORE. (Tel: 07815 908017 between 5-7pm day before for order and on website).

    For registered horses qualified in accordance with rule 312.6.

    Rule 313, to be ridden by Full, Associate or Pony Associate members.

    Table A8.

    Speed 350mpm.

    First two horses, disregarding those already qualified will qualify for HOYS.

    The first five, disregarding those already qualified, will qualify for the Cushionbed British Showjumping/Scope Festival.

    Rosettes sponsored by EquestrianClearance.com Prizes: £200 £150 £100 £75 £50 £28 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £30 / After Closing Date: £30 Class 37: SECTION A: HORSE & HOUND FOXHUNTER / SECTION B: 1.20M OPEN Please state section on entry form.

    For reg.

    Horses ridden by Adult/Associate/Pony Associate members.

    Rule 310, Speed 350mpm, Table A7.

    This class will be split if 30 or more starters.

    Horses may compete in one section only. Prizes: £75 £55 £35 £20 £20 £20 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £18 / After Closing Date: £20 Class 38: HIGHLAND SECURITY SYSTEMS GRAND PRIX Sponsored by Highland Security Systems Drawn Order For Reg.

    Horses.

    Starting Height 1.30m, Table A10, speed 350mpm.

    In the first round the second half of the course to be built 5-10cm higher than the first half.

    In the event of equality of penalties for first place, there will be one jump off against the clock, other competitors are placed according to their penalties and time in first round and the jump off course will be 5-10cm higher than the second half of the first round.

    Perpetual Challenge Trophy and Rug to the winner. 1st 3 riders will receive Ariat Prizes. Prizes: £500 £400 £300 £200 £100 Entry Fee Paid Before Closing Date £35 / After Closing Date: £40 INCLUDEPICTURE http://www.highland-security.co.uk/highland web site/index page/0 header.gif \* MERGEFORMATINET Secure your premises with gates and high quality CCTV systems. Suppliers of Brendon Stud and Hickstead’s new gate entrance system.

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    Horses-Store.com and  Keith Bristow    Class 1: SCOPE THERMOHOMES EUROPE UK 1

    Horses-Store.com - Keith Bristow Class 1: SCOPE THERMOHOMES EUROPE UK 1

    Horses-Store.com and  Keith Bristow    Class 1: SCOPE THERMOHOMES EUROPE UK 1

    Horses-Store.com - Keith Bristow Class 1: SCOPE THERMOHOMES EUROPE UK 1

    Engagement : That’s nearly 2 per minute Transitions both between within the….

    Equi.Linn Sports Lingerie for women with style Horses-store.comEngagement : That’s nearly 2 per minute Transitions both between within the….

    • • DO  have  specific  exercises  planned.    You  need     be  able  to  ride  transitions  and  school  figures   to   at     specific  points  in  the  ring.   DO  have  the  exercises  you  work  in  your  warm-­‐ st up,  1    work  and  2nd  work  relate.    ie  You  work   20m  circles  in  your  warm  up,  15m  circles  in  trot   st   in  your  1  work  and  10m  circles  in  trot  in  your   nd 2  work.     • • DO   be   prepared   to   improvise   or   change   your     if  things  aren’t  going  well.       plan   DO     practice  sitting  trot    and  no-­‐stirrup  work  but   NOT   until   your   horses   back   muscles   are     warmed   up  (15  –  20min  into  your  ride)   DO     aim  to  ride  at  least  100  transitions  per  ride.   That’s   nearly   2   per   minute!     Transitions   (both     between   &   within   the   gaits)   help   to   increase   your  horse’s  suppleness,  develop  connection  &     engagement  and  keeps  your  horse  focused.   This  horse  is  carrying  himself  very  well.    His   hindquarters  are  engaged  (hocks  flexed  and   hindquarters  carrying  more  weight).    This  lowers  the   hind  end  which  creates  a  light  forehand.    He  is  round   over  his  back  and  his  neck  is  raised  from  the  wither.    His   frame  is  correct,  with  his  poll  as  the  highest  point  and   his  nose  just  slightly  in  front  of  the  vertical.     • DON’TS   • DON’T  forget  that  one  hour  of  work  independently  is   much  more  intense  than  a  one  hour  group  lesson.    If   feel  your  horse  getting  tired  or  loosing  focus,  take  a   break.      Just  because  you’re  allowed  to  ride  for  an   hour  doesn’t  mean  you  have  to.    If  you’ve   accomplished  good  work,  don’t  keep  going  until  it   falls  apart,  end  on  a  positive  note.    An  overworked   and  sour  horse  will  not  help  your  show  season.       DON’T  run  your  dressage  tests  over  and  over.     Practice  each  movement  individually  with  focus  on   the  movements  and  transitions  you  struggle  with.    If   you  run  through  the  test  too  many  times,  horses  will   start  to  anticipate  the  transitions  and  may  do  them   before  you  want  them  too!   DON’T  try  to  pull  your  horses  head  into  a  false   frame.    Remember,  to  truly  have  your  horse  “in  a   frame”  or  “on  the  bit”  they  must  be  in  front  of  your   leg,  pushing  from  behind,  rounding  up  through  their   back  and  moving  forward  into  a  soft  and  elastic   contact.      Lots  of  bending  exercises  and  transitions,  if   ridden  properly,  will  put  your  horse  into  a  frame   without  even  trying!                         horse  may  look  fancy  at  first  glance,  but  don’t   This   let  the  dramatic  front  leg  extension  fool  you!    This     horse’s  hind  end  is  trailing  behind,  his  back  is   hollowing   and  he  is  carrying  too  much  weight  on     the  forehand.    The  rider  has  pulled  his  head  in  by     and  the  horse  is  incorrectly  bending  at  the  3rd   force   vertebrate  instead  of  at  the  pole.    This  horse  is  also   over  bent,  with  the  nose  behind  the  vertical.   • •           COLLECTION   (Self-­‐Carriage,   Increased  engagement,   Lightness  on  the  forehand)   STRAIGHTNESS   (Improved  alignment  &  Balance   IMPULSION   (Increased  Energy  &  Thrust)         Dressage   Training  Pyramid     CONNECTION   (Acceptance  of  the  Bit  through     Acceptance  of  the  Aids)   RELAXATION   (With  Elasticity  &  Suppleness)       Rhythm:  “Rhythm  is  the  term  used  for  the   characteristic  sequence  of  footfalls  and   timing  of  a  pure  walk,  pure  trot  and  pure   canter.    The  rhythm  should  be  expressed   with  energy  and  in  a  suitable  tempo  with   the  horse  remaining  in  balance  appropriate   to  his  training.”    (from  the  USFD  definition)    Relaxation:  Relaxation  is  the  quality   dressage  tests  refer  to  when  it  states  “that   RHYTHM   the  horse’s  muscles  are  supple  and  loose.”     (Consistent  With  Energy  &  Tempo)   “Relaxation  refers  to  the  horse’s  mental     state  (calmness  without  anxiety  or  nervousness”,  as  well  as  his  physical  state  (the  absence  of  negative   muscular  tension.  Usually,  the  mental  and  physical  states  go  hand-­‐in-­‐hand.    The  horse  learns  to  accept  the   influence  of  the  rider  without  becoming  tense.    He  moves  with  elasticity  and  a  supple  swinging  back,  allowing   the  rider  to  bend  him  laterally  (side  to  side)  as  well  as  longitudinally  (lengthen  and  shorten  his  frame).”   Connection:  When  the  horse  is  accepting  the  rider’s  hands,  seat,  and  legs,  it  is  said  that  he  is  offering  good   contact.  Many  people  mistake  contact  for  the  horse  being  on  the  bit.  That  is  not  necessarily  true  and   encourages  riding  with  the  hands  alone.  A  horse  moving  under  a  rider  is  in  contact  with  his  seat,  legs,  and   hands.  Good  contact  is  when  the  horse  accepts  and  responds  to  seat  and  leg  aids  while  maintaining  a  round   outline  with  a  mouth  that  is  relaxed  and  accepting  the  bit.  You  can  point  out  good  contact  when  the  horse’s   back  is  raised,  his  quarters  engaged,  his  poll  the  highest  point,  his  jaw  relaxed,  and  his  nose  a  hint  in  front  of   the  vertical  (which  is  also  a  sign  of  good  riding  and  training).    Impulsion:  Free-­‐flowing  energy  initiated  by  the  rider,  causing  the  horse’s  back  to  swing,  his  quarters  to   engage,  and  his  forelegs  to  articulate  is  impulsion.  Good  impulsion  is  mirrored  through  a  horse  that  appears   to  have  an  innate  desire  to  go  forward  with  active,  lively  steps.  How  far  the  horse  steps  underneath  his  barrel   and  how  much  he  engages  his  hocks  are  both  measures  of  impulsion.  Basic  training  regulates  the  horse’s   engine  so  that  impulsion  becomes  second  nature  to  the  horse  and  the  rider  does  not  have  to  push  all  the   time.   Straightness:  Horses  are  naturally  crooked,  so  straightening  them  is  the  job  of  the  rider/trainer.  For  example,   many  horses  canter  with  their  quarters  slightly  in.  Crookedness  is  caused  by  uneven  lateral  suppleness,  ie   one  side  stiffer  than  the  other,  and  a  weaker  hind  leg.  Good  training  focuses  on  developing  both  sides  and   hind  legs  of  the  horse  equally,  which  eventually  leads  to  absolute  straightness.  A  horse  is  truly  straight  when   the  hind  foot  steps  in  the  line  of  the  front  foot  (or  sometimes  a  little  deeper  to  the  inside  in  the  event  of   collection).   Collection:  The  pinnacle  of  the  Training  Pyramid,  collection  is  the  ultimate  goal  for  the  dressage  horse.  When   all  the  previous  elements  are  present,  collection  just  happens!  Collection  involves  the  lowering  of  the  croup,   lightness  of  the  forehand,  and  shorter  and  higher  steps.  Collection  is  possible  in  the  walk,  trot  and  canter,  and   is  achieved  by  collecting  exercises  and  refined  by  little  half-­‐halts.  A  rider  on  a  horse  doing  a  great  collected   canter  feels  as  though  he/she  can  let  go  and  the  horse  would  still  maintain  perfect  rhythm  and  self-­‐carriage   without  any  interference  from  the  rider.  

    Read more about Engagement : That’s nearly 2 per minute Transitions both between within the….:

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    Horses-Store.com and Engagement : That’s nearly 2 per minute Transitions both between within the….

    Horses-Store.com - Engagement : That’s nearly 2 per minute Transitions both between within the….

    Horses-Store.com and Engagement : That’s nearly 2 per minute Transitions both between within the….

    Horses-Store.com - Engagement : That’s nearly 2 per minute Transitions both between within the….

    Pessoa Saddles : 6 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale Graduate is Grand Champion….

    Silver plated necklace with horse shoe Horses-store.comPessoa Saddles : 6 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale Graduate is Grand Champion….

    2006 American Hunter Pony Classic BEST EVER The 2006 American Hunter Pony Classic posted major increases in nearly every category.

    Statistically, the 2006 sale ranks as the best American Hunter Pony Classic ever and possibly the best Pony Auction ever held in North America. “This was a great auction.

    The buyers were active from beginning to end.” said Tim Jennings, Marketing Director of Professional Auction Services, Inc. “The catalog included the best group of ponies the sale has ever offered.” A four year old daughter of Penrhyn Sporting Chance was the high selling pony at $67,000.

    Flower, a gray small pony, was sold by Leading Consignor Richard Taylor’s Venture Stable.

    She was purchased by Mike Heintschel of Escondido, California.

    Taylor commented, “This is the best child’s pony I have ever brought to the sale”.

    A new North American Record Price for a Yearling Pony was set when Prue Richardson’s Northwind sent Northwind Maradonna into the sale ring late in the sale as hip number 90.

    Northwind Maradonna was Hunter Pony Breeding Grand Champion at the 2006 Devon Horse Show.

    He was purchased by Melissa Burns of Wellington, Florida.

    Northwind Maradonna was the only yearling offered at the sale.

    He is by Small-Land Martello and out of Northwind Justa A Laugh.

    The High Selling two year old was Sporting Life, a filly by Penhryn Sporting Chance.

    The filly was sold for $20,000 by Bill Schaub agent for Bill Schaub and Peakewood Pharm to Janet Read of Welling ton, Florida.

    Schaub purchased the filly at the 2005 Select Pony Breeders Production Sale in Virginia.

    Eight Two Year Olds sold for an average price of $10,150.

    A small pony was High Selling Three Year Old.

    Oompa Loompa, who placed second at the Devon and Upperville Horse Shows in 2006, topped all other three year old sold.

    The gelding was sold by by Bill Schaub agent for Bill Schaub and Peakewood Pharm to Olivia Golden of Reading Pennsylvania.

    Oompa Loompa was sold under his registered name of Farnley Ascot at the 2005 Farnley Farm & Shenandoah Stud Production Sale.

    Three Year Old Ponies averaged $14,554.

    The American Hunter Pony Classic was produced by Professional Auction Services, Inc.

    Of Berryville, Virginia.

    The auction firm was formed in 1978 and has produced over 210 auctions selling 50,000 horses and ponies for $160,000,000. Sale records were set in 5 major statistical category.

    Average Sale Price………………$13,230………………UP 16%………………….

    Highest Ever Median Price……………………….. $10,200………………UP 40%………………….

    Highest Ever Gross Sales………………………….$926,100……………

    UP 59%………………….

    Highest Ever # sold for $10,000 or more…. 37……………………….UP 85%………………….

    Highest Ever # sold for $5,000 or more…….61……………………….UP 52%………………….

    Highest Ever High Selling Yearling…………….$15,700………………A NEW NORTH AMERICAN RECORD PRICE # Cataloged…………………………..107……………………..UP 3%……………………2nd Largest Ever # Sold…………………………………… 70……………………….UP 37%………………… 2nd Highest Ever High Seller…………………………….$67,000……………………………………………… 3rd Highest Ever # at $20,000 +……………………….10……………………….UP 11%………………… 2nd Highest Ever Top 10 Average…………………….$34,040………………UP 22%………………… 2nd Highest Ever % Sold……………………………………72%…………………….3rd Highest Percentage Sold Ever Leading Sires with Two or More Sold by Average Sire………………………………………………………

    Average…………

    Number Sold Penhryn Sporting Chance…………………….$31,767……………………………. 3 Pengyn………………………………………………….$15,167……………………………. 3 Blue Rain………………………………………………$11,950……………………………. 2 Loafer’s Lodge Spring Ahead…………………$7,623……………………………. 3 Sailor’s Delight………………………………………. $7,150……………………………. 2 Leading Consignors with Two or More Sold by Average Consignor……………………………………………………………….Average…………Number Sold Sam & Jill Manno, agent……………………………..$28,100…………………………….2 Bill Schaub, agent……………………………………….$22,625…………………………….8 Richard M.

    Taylor, Venture Stalbe……………….$17,957…………………………….7 Prue Richardson, Northwind, agent……………$14,500…………………………….5 Daryl Stout, Soneledge Stables…………………. $13,750…………………………….2 Jennifer Thompson, agent………………………….$11,420…………………………….5 Karen Zinkhan, Bit By Bit Stable………………….$10,825…………………………….4 Andrea Barr, agent………………………………………$10,100…………………………….3 Mary Ann Funk, Ashwood Farm, agent………….$9,925…………………………….4 Emily Elek, agent…………………………………………..$6,967…………………………….6 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale Graduate is Grand Champion of the Largest Pony Finals in History Two new Pessoa saddles were awarded to the highest placing sale graduates showing in the Regular Pony Hunter an Green Pony Hunter Divisions of the 2006 Wild Horsefeathers/USEF National Grand Hunter Pony Championship.

    The saddles were presented by English Riding Supply, exclusive distributors for Pessoa Saddles, and Professional Auction Services, Inc.

    The saddle awarded to the top pony in the regular division went to the Overall Grand Champion of the largest Pony Finals ever held, Rockette, a 13.2-hand, seven-year-old crossbred pony mare, owned by Grand Slam Farm and Rachel Degabrielle, was shown by Kaitlyn Campbell, Campbell was a catch-rider, riding Rockette for the first time in the warm-up on Tuesday.

    Rockette and Campbell Rockette was sold as Highland’s Little Nell at the 2001 American Hunter Pony Classic held in Ashville, North Carolina.

    Highland’s Little Nell set a North American record for a the highest price attained by a two year old pony at auction when the gavel fell at $29,000 for her seller, Jennifer Thompson, agent for the breeders, Jeanne Gelber and Eileen Listrani of The Grey Pony, LTD of Highland Maryland.

    She was purchased by Marc Rutenburg of Palm Harbor, Florida.

    Rockette is a 7 year old daughter of JLA Sir William and out the the Thoroughbred mare Windair.

    She was second at the 2001 Upperville Colt and Horse Show in the Two Year Old Fillies class.competition for the Saddle awarded to the Highest Placing Green Pony Hunter went to the wire with two ponies owned by Bill Schaub and ridden by Taylor Ann Adams.

    True Blue was second in the Medium Green Pony Hunter Division just edging All Heart who was third in the Large Green Ponies.

    True Blue was sold as Hillcrest’s Blue Smoke in the 2004 American Hunter Pony Classic for $23,500 by Greg Rhoades of Williston, Florida and was purchased by Marion Gleijeses of Clayton, Missouri.

    Hillcrest’s Blue Smoke is a registered Half-Bred Welsh by Gayfield’s Vida Blue and out of Lad’s Amelia.

    All Heart set the record for the highest price ever for a pony in the American Hunter Pony Classic when the gelding sold for $75,000 at the 2005 American Hunter Pony Classic as Foxlair Fandango.

    Foxlair Fandango was sold by Richard M.

    Taylor’s Venture Stable for the breeder, Stuart Kohler.

    Foxlair Fandango is by Penhryn Sporting Chance out of Dance On Snow. High Selling Ponies 2006 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale Hip# 66 Flower 2002 Grey Crossbred Welsh Mare Sire Penrhyn Sporting Chance Dam Bluebell Consignor Richard M.

    Taylor Venture Stables Buyer Mike Heintschel Hip# 4 Silver Talent $50,000.00 2001 Grey Welsh Gelding Sire Salvandi Calidog Dam Woolen Hills Treasure Winner of 4 out of 5 Young Pony Hunter Under Saddle Classes.

    Consignor Sam & Jill Manno, Agent Janno Farm Buyer Amy Lewis Hip# 87 One More Time $50,000.00 2000 Black Roan Crossbred Welsh Gelding Sire Cross Gates Larasan Dam Glenmore’s Just As Funny Consignor Bill Schaub, Agent Over The Hill Farm Buyer Lisa Rossi Hip# 23 Trading Spaces 1998 Black Crossbred Welsh Gelding Sire Unknown Dam Unknown Qualified for thePony Finals in 2005 and 2006.

    Consignor Adie Amorose Shadowlake Farm Buyer Julia Christian Hip# 70 Northwind Just Be Mine $29,500.00 2000 Grey Crossbred Mare Sire Cusop Jovial Dam Northwind Among The Stars 2005 Ontario Champion Children’s Pony & Medium Green Pony.

    Consignor Prue Richardson Northwind Buyer Elm Tree Farm Hip# 39 Wingetti 2001 Black Warmblood Pony Mare Sire Unknown Dam Unknown Consignor Bill Schaub, Agent Over The Hill Farm Buyer Jennifer Taylor $25,500.00 $35,000.00 $67,000.00 Hip# 97 Oompa Loompa …

    Aka Farnley Ascot $22,500.00 2003 Roan Chestnut Welsh Gelding Sire Farnley Magic Word (Welsh) Dam Farnley Kerchief Consignor Bill Schaub, Agent Over The Hill Farm Buyer Olivia Golden Hip# 65 Farnley Sarah 2001 Grey Half Welsh Mare Sire Alra Amber Classic (Welsh) Dam Q.

    R.

    Sally Consignor Bill Schaub, Agent Over The Hill Farm Buyer Bobby Selman Hip# 17 Sporting Life $20,000.00 2004 Chestnut Crossbred Welsh Mare Sire Penrhyn Sporting Chance Dam Light Of My Life Consignor Bill Schaub, Agent Over The Hill Farm Buyer Janet Read Hip# 104 O.

    L.

    Chrome Wheels 2003 Chestnut Half Welsh Gelding Sire Farnley Blue Ribbon Dam Jessie’s Girl Consignor Margaret Redman, Agent Twin Oak Farm Buyer Robbi Hunt Hip# 33 White Oaks All That 2003 Dark Bay Crossbred Welsh Gelding Sire Pengwyn Dam Hunny Bunny Consignor Daryl Stout Stoneledge Stables Buyer Pegasus Equestrian Center Hip# 29 TR Rockhop $18,000.00 2003 Bay Half Welsh Gelding Sire Pengwyn Dam No Testamony 2005 MPB Champion , 2004 MPB Reserve Champion.

    Currently 3rd Zone 3 Pony Hunter Breeding 3-Year-Olds.

    Consignor Karen Zinkhan, Agent Bit By Bit Stable Buyer Pegasus Equestrian Center $18,500.00 $20,000.00 $21,000.00 Hip# 77 Highlands Wind Song $18,000.00 2003 Bay Crossbred Welsh Mare Sire JLA Sir William Dam Ashley River Winner 2006 Devon Horse Show 3-YO Fillies. 2005 Upperville winner, 2004 MPB Futurity Grand Champion.

    Consignor Jennifer Thompson, Agent Pine Haven Farm Buyer Raymond Riddle Hip# 98 Nimbustwothousand $16,700.00 1995 Bay Crossbred Welsh Gelding Sire Unknown Dam Unknown Entered at 2006 Pony Finals.

    Champion many times at major shows.

    Consignor Kathy Gillmer, Agent Buyer Christina Lawhon Hip# 63 FMF Jessie’s Pegasus 2003 Palomino Half Welsh Gelding Sire Glynhafan Corona Dam Unknown Champion on the line.

    Consignor Daryl Insley Layfield Farms Buyer Deborah L Martiniello Seven Hills Welsh, Llc Hip# 67 Highlands Magic Touch $16,500.00 2003 Black Roan Crossbred Welsh / WB Gelding Sire Mapale Side Mr.

    Magic Dam Cinderella Jones Consignor Jennifer Thompson, Agent Pine Haven Farm Buyer Rebecca Farless Hip# 21 Stonewall Cirrus $16,200.00 2002 Grey Crossbred Welsh Mare Sire Hillcrest’s Top Hat Dam Woodland’s Flying Cloud Consignor Emily A.

    Elek Stonewall Farm Buyer Louise Mann Hip# 75 Foxmor Chit Chat $16,000.00 2003 Bay Crossbred Welsh Mare Sire Foxmor After Dark Dam Shenandoah Greenspring Consignor Bill Schaub, Agent Over The Hill Farm Buyer Lori Allen $16,500.00 Hip# 90 Northwind Maradonna $15,700.00 2005 Bay Crossbred Gelding Sire Small-Land Martello Dam Northwind Just A Laugh 2006 Devon Horse Show Hunter Pony Grand Champion.

    Consignor Prue Richardson Northwind Buyer Melissa Burns Hip# 58 BSF Royal Blue 2002 Grey Crossbred Welsh Gelding Sire Blue Rain Dam Silver Fly Consignor Richard M.

    Taylor, Agent Venture Stables Buyer Janet Read Hip# 10 Solaris 2002 Grey Crossbred Welsh / TB Mare Sire Liseters Joy Boy Dam Obsession Consignor Diane Daly Windy Willow Farm Buyer Scott Bowman Hip# 27 Stars Go Blue 2003 Grey Crossbred Welsh Gelding Sire Farnley Belshazzar Dam Blue Beret Consignor Bill Schaub, Agent Over The Hill Farm Buyer Olivia Golden Hip# 56 Crystal Acres Cookie Monster 2004 Tobiano Crossbred Welsh Mare Sire *Menai Mister Mostyn Dam All Dressed Up Consignor Kelly Ward-Creagh Crystal Acres Buyer Mary Ann Jofko Hip# 50 Beaverwood’s Lilac $14,500.00 1999 Bay Welsh Mare Sire Rotherwood Crown Prince Dam Beaverwood’s China Doll Consignor Prue Richardson, Agent Northwind Buyer Pam Muller Hip# 36 Woodlands Red Bird $13,500.00 1998 Chestnut Crossbred Welsh Gelding Sire Woodlands Velvet Rain Dam Woodlands Silver Swan Consignor Andrea L.

    Barr, Agent Riverside Farms, LLC Buyer Jamie Hormel $15,000.00 $15,000.00 $15,000.00 $15,200.00 RESULTS Sorted by Gender 2006 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale MARE Average High Seller Low Seller $12,412

    Read more about Pessoa Saddles : 6 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale Graduate is Grand Champion….:

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    Horses-Store.com and Pessoa Saddles : 6 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale Graduate is Grand Champion….

    Horses-Store.com - Pessoa Saddles : 6 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale Graduate is Grand Champion….

    Horses-Store.com and Pessoa Saddles : 6 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale Graduate is Grand Champion….

    Horses-Store.com - Pessoa Saddles : 6 American Hunter Pony Classic Sale Graduate is Grand Champion….

    Type : Overo Typical Overo Patterns The second generally accepted type of….

    Silver plated necklace with horse shoe Horses-store.comType : Overo Typical Overo Patterns The second generally accepted type of….

    Typical Tobiano Patterns The characteristics of tobiano A tobiano’s feet and varying portions of its legs are usually white, the head usually has no more white than normally found on a non-spotted horse, and the spots usually cross the topline somewhere between the ears and tail.

    Tobiano spots are typically crisply delineated from the colored areas and have a vertical the border, almost like a halo or a shadow.

    Another peculiarity of some tobianos is the presence of “ink spots” in the white patches.

    These spots are small and generally round in shape. Overo Typical Overo Patterns The second generally accepted type of spotting is overo (pronounced: oh vair´ oh).

    Knowing the history behind the term overo may be helpful in understanding the somewhat confusing situation of having multiple patterns with one name.

    Overo is a Spanish word, originally meaning “like an egg.” In this case, it refers to speckling or spotting.

    Long ago, in South America, the term overo was used for all the various spotting patterns in horses: tobiano, overo (all three types) and also the blanket and leopard patterns typical of Appaloosas.

    In Argentina, the word overo is still used to describe all the different spotting patterns other than tobiano.

    In the United States, overo is usually used to mean “Paint, but not tobiano.” This has resulted in the lumping together of three different spotting patterns under one name, and the result can be confusion in breeding programs.

    The term overo covers three genetically distinct patterns: frame overo, sabino and splashed white. Frame Overo The name “frame” refers to the usual appearance, which is of white patches centered in the body and neck, and framed by colored areas around them.

    The usual frame pattern has a horizontal arrangement and does not cross the topline, as does tobiano.

    The overo’s head is usually quite extensively marked with white and the eyes are commonly blue.

    The feet and legs of frame overos are usually dark, although white feet and minor APHA Coat Color Genetics Guide • 1 Frame Overo with the gene can be mated to horses without it, resulting in foals that are about half carriers and halfnon-carrier foals, but avoiding completely the production of lethal whites. Sabino Overo In literal Spanish, sabino (pronounced: sah bee´ no) means pale or speckled.

    In Europe, and increasingly in the United States, sabino is used to describe a unique and interesting pattern of white spotting in horses.

    Sabino horses usually have four white feet and white legs.

    The white usually extends up the legs in ragged patches, and then extends onto the horse’s body from the belly.

    The head is usually fairly white and the eyes are commonly blue.

    Many sabino horses have partially blue, partially brown eyes.

    Flecks, patches and roan areas are common on sabinos, in contrast to the frame overos, which are usually more crisply marked.

    Sabino occurs in a large number of breeds worldwide, including Paints, Thoroughbreds and Clydesdales.

    The pattern is commonly the cause of spotted foals that appear in breeds that frown on them, such as the British pony breeds and the Quarter Horse.

    The sabino pattern is also a great imitator, and some of these horses are nearly perfect mimics of tobiano or frame overo.

    When the sabino pattern is minimally expressed, the horse usually has four white socks and a blaze.

    Usually there is some betrayal of the fact that these are not the usual white marks on horses, due to some ragged edge or long, narrow extension up the leg.

    Some sabinos also have odd white patches on the knee or hock, removed from the main portion of the lower white mark.

    A few sabinos do have a dark foot or two, although most have four white feet.

    Minimally marked sabinos are easily confused with truly nonspotted horses.

    In the middle range of expression, sabino horses are fairly distinctive and are usually difficult to confuse with other patterns. white leg marks are as common on frame overos as they are on nonspotted horses.

    The white areas on frame overos are usually crisply and cleanly delineated from the colored areas, although some have a halo or shadow of pigmented skin under white hair directly at the boundary.

    The frame overo pattern occurs in a limited range of horse breeds.

    It seems to appear only in breeds that have Spanish ancestry, including the Paint Horse.

    The genetics of frame overo has only recently been documented.

    Frame overo behaves as a dominant gene.

    It is common to mate frame overo horses to nonspotted horses, and about half of the resulting foals are spotted.

    On many occasions, though, there are records of frame overos being produced by two nonspotted parents.

    This is typical of a recessive gene, and it is not logical to have both a recessive and a dominant control over the same pattern.

    Some of these horses are genetically frame overo, but have failed to get a body spot.

    They are essentially very dark frame overos—so dark that the spots are all gone from the body.

    They still have the gene, however, and can still produce frame overo-spotted offspring.

    At the whiter extreme, frame overo is the pattern most closely associated with Overo Lethal White Syndrome (see page 16).

    Recent characterization of the gene responsible for lethal white foal syndrome has confirmed that foals with two doses of the lethal white gene are white and die soon after birth from gut innervation abnormalities.

    Horses with only one dose survive.

    This documentation is important for Paint Horse breeders.

    With DNA tests now available to identify the lethal white gene, it is possible to test breeding horses.

    Those 2 • APHA Coat Color Genetics Guide — TO to Determining Tobiano Homozygosity Breeding a homozygous tobiano should produce all tobiano foals, with the exception of a rare minimal-white.

    A horse that produces five tobianos out of five solid mates is thought to have a 97 percent chance of being homozygous.

    Seven tobianos from seven solid partners increases the odds to 99 percent.

    Ten tobiano offspring from 10 solid mates increases the odds to 99.9 percent.

    In addition, genetic marker analysis is used to try to identify homozygous tobianos.

    This analysis is similar to playing the game Clue.

    Certain facts are given, and then by the process of elimination one tries to determine which parent or parents supplied the tobiano gene.

    Remember, the horse must have been produced from the mating of two tobianos.

    Tovero parents do qualify.

    The tobiano gene is linked to a gene unit comprised of the E gene (see page 12), the Rn gene (see page 17), and two other genes, ALB and GC, that code for blood proteins.

    These four genes lie so close together on the same chromosome that they are usually passed on as a unit to the next generation, making their presence an important clue to determining a tobiano’s homozygosity.

    This fact creates the opportunity to trace movement of the tobiano gene.

    The ALB blood protein comes in two forms—A or B—while F and S are the symbols given to the two forms of the GC gene.

    A major clue to determining tobiano homozygosity is that 90 percent of the time, the tobiano gene is associated with the B form of the AL gene and S form of the GC gene.

    The blood test that is currently used in the search for the homozygous tobiano determines which form of the AL and GC genes a particular horse has.

    And don’t forget that the expression of the E provides a color trace for the tobiano gene, as well.

    This means that the tobiano gene lies close to the gene that determines whether the base color of the horse is red or black—e or E, respectively.

    The goal is to determine which form of the E gene is linked to the TO. (The roan gene, which is in the E Rn ALB GC unit, appears to commonly exist in the recessive form Rn+.

    It is extremely rare to find a roan tobiano.) APHA Coat Color Genetics Guide • 5 Breeding the Overo Paint Little is known about the genetics that create overo patterns.

    It is commonly accepted that overo patterns are under the influence of one or more dominant genes.

    It appears that each of the patterns may be the result of a dominant gene, but it is also possible that there is only one gene and that gene modifiers change the pattern.

    There is also some evidence that the genes that produce leg and facial markings may influence the amount of white on an overo.

    This appears to be true for the sabino and splashed white patterns.

    The frame overo, like the tobiano, is thought to be less sensitive to these genes.

    Time and research will eventually answer these questions.

    For now, here is what the three overo patterns seem to have in common.

    All the overo patterns have a large range of expression.

    At one end, they appear mostly white.

    At the other end, a minimal-white overo may be hard to distinguish from a solid horse.

    These minimal-white overos may be the reason that so many breeders think that overo appears at random from solid horses.

    It may also be the reasoning behind the belief that it is easier to get an overo by breeding an overo to a solid that has an overo parent.

    These overo breeding stocks may be minimal-white overos.

    The development of a test to determine the presence of the overo gene(s) will go a long way toward sorting out this confusion.

    The possibility of there being a homozygous overo does not look good.

    It is thought that the homozygous overo is plagued by the lethal white syndrome.

    Lethal white foals die shortly after birth due to lack of proper development of their digestive systems.

    There have been cases of lethal white syndrome occurring from the mating of an overo to a solid.

    Because of this, the question becomes: Were these solid horses minimalwhite overos carrying an overo gene and therefore producing a homozygous overo foal, or is there some other gene action associated with the overo that occasionally produces foals with the lethal white syndrome? To confuse the matter further, each overo pattern has the ability to produce nearly white normal foals.

    This is not to say that these foals may not be plagued by some of the other problems associated with mostly white horses.

    There is some evidence that deafness may occur more often in nearly white horses.

    And with age, the pink skin around the eyes of a white horse quite often develops cancer.

    In spite of the similar action of the hypothesized overo genes, each type of overo has a characteristic pattern. 6 • APHA Coat Color Genetics Guide Breeding the Frame Overo Frame overos range from being nearly totally white to the minimal-white individual.

    The minimal-white frame overo characteristically has a lot of white on its face and a solid body with minimal white leg markings.

    Regardless of the expression of the frame overo pattern, these horses produce overo foals 50 percent of the time.

    It has been hypothesized that the frame overo is under the control of a single gene, which is designated Fr.

    Frame overos are known to produce lethal white foals.

    It is not known at this time whether this condition is created by a homozygous frame overo—FrFr— but the condition is highly correlated with large amounts of white on the foal. Defining Minimal-White Frame Overo • A great deal of white on the face. • Solid bodies. • Normal solid horse, minimal leg markings.

    These horses may be registered as Solid Paint-Bred, but in reality they are overos and will produce overos 50 percent of the time. Frame Overo Breeding the Splashed White Overo According to Dr.

    Bowling’s work, the splashed white pattern is under the control of a dominant gene identified by the letters Spl.

    At this point, there has not been a documented mating of two splashed white overos creating a homozygous individual. Defining Minimal Splashed-White Overo • A great deal of white on the face. • Solid bodies, perhaps with a small white spot on the belly. • White leg markings.

    These horses may be registered as Solid Paint-Bred, but in reality they are overos and will produce overos 50 percent of the time. — Coat Colors A good horse is a good horse, regardless of its color.

    Yet, color can be a major asset when a horse is for sale, and it can make a difference in the amount of attention a horse gets in the show ring.

    In addition to sporting various patterns of white patches—expressed as tobiano, frame overo, sabino, splashed white or tovero—every Paint Horse also has a background color.

    Coat patterns have many background colors, and controlling them genetically can be complicated.

    Anyone wishing to breed for specific background colors has an interesting challenge before them.

    The breeder must combine specific colors with specific Paint spotting patterns, which requires careful planning and a knowledge of genetics.

    Some Paint breeders prefer darker background colors, such as bay, chestnut and black, over the lighter colors such as dun, palomino, grullo or buckskin.

    The reason for this preference is because the contrast between the white Paint patterns and the darker base colors shows up better than it does with the lighter colors.

    This rule, though, is not absolute, and the light-colored duns, grullos, buckskins and palominos are popular among many breeders.

    Taste in color is an individual preference.

    Perhaps it is because of this variety of preferences that coat color genetics is one of the few areas of equine genetics where scientists have been able to develop sophisticated theories about how specific genes determine the color of a horse’s hair.

    However, it is important to realize that much of the theory of coat color genetics is just that—theory.

    At this point in time, only the presence of four color genes can be confirmed in the laboratory: the tobiano gene, the recessive form of a gene that creates a red horse, the cream gene and the agouti (bay/black).

    The action of the rest of the color genes is purely hypothetical.

    Because of this, theories may change as more tests become available to identify specific genes.

    Identifying coat colors can also be confusing.

    There is a tremendous range of shades within a color, and different types of color without recognized names.

    There are also coat colors that appear to be identical but are under the influence of different genes.

    Breed associations have also contributed to some of the confusion.

    Thoroughbreds registered by the Jockey Club are called roans if they have a red body with white hairs.

    According to their definitions, grays are dark horses that are graying.

    Technically, whenever the gray gene is present, the horse is gray regardless of basic coat color.

    Horses of any color (with the exception of true white) can gray.

    The American Quarter Horse Association, trying to keep up with the current coat color theory, has changed the description of a “buckskin.” In the past, a buckskin was any canvas-colored horse with black points.

    It could have zebra markings and a line-back and still be a buckskin.

    Today, all linebacked horses with zebra markings are referred to as duns by AQHA, unless they are sorrel or chestnut duns.

    These are called red duns.

    Black duns are called grullos.

    APHA’s color criteria is the most descriptive of the three associations when it comes to roan, giving roan three basic colors: black (blue), bay and red.

    Starting in 2000, it became possible to register bay roans, while the term red roan designates sorrel/chestnut roans.

    If all of this sounds confusing, take heart.

    It is possible to stack the deck in your favor when trying to produce a specific-colored offspring—if you understand the underlying genes that create the colors. 8 • APHA Coat Color Genetics Guide The Basic Rules of Coat Color Genetics While it is true that the control of color is complicated, it is also true that the lighter colors are all dominant to the darker ones.

    This general rule is oversimplified, but it works in most cases.

    Therefore, the light colors do not pop out—except rarely—as surprises.

    That is, you have to breed to a light color to get a foal of a light color.

    This fact has some consequences for Paint breeders.

    If the breeder prefers the darker base colors, then it is important to always select the darker colors for their breeding programs.

    This is especially true if outcrosses are sought, because the lighter colors are fairly common in the Quarter Horse.

    They are present, but rare, in the Thoroughbred.

    On the other hand, if the light base colors are desired, then it is important for the breeder to always include at least one light-colored parent in matings in order to boost the chances of producing a light-colored foal.

    The downside of using two light-colored horses in a cross (specifically palominos and buckskins) is the occasional production of cream-colored horses—the cremello and perlino.

    These horses are nearly white, and it is difficult to see the contrast between any Paint spotting and the pale background color.

    The line-backed dun colors only rarely can produce a cremello foal, making them safer to mate to other light colors because cream foals occur in such matings infrequently.

    The darker colors, usually considered to include bay, chestnut and black, are easier for most breeding programs.

    These have a peculiar interaction in that chestnut (and sorrel) are recessive to bay and black, but act to cover them up.

    This means that it is impossible to tell just from looking whether a chestnut or sorrel horse has the genetic makeup to produce black or bay.

    Testing for the Agouti gene is helpful. Bay Horses Bay is the second most common horse color.

    Controlled by the A gene, a bay horse has a reddish brown body with black points.

    The A gene creates these black points by limiting the placement of black on the horse’s coat to the mane, tail, legs and ears.

    The two genetic loci (locations) that control the color of the bay, black and sorrel horse are the Agouti (A) and Extension (E).

    The way these loci interact creates these three Heterozygous Bay (AaEE) basic body colors.

    Agouti controls the distri- Mated to Chestnut (Aaee) Bay bution of the red and black AE aE areas on horses that can form Chestnut AAeE AaeE black pigment, ie, blacks, Ae bay bay bays, buckskins, etc.

    AAeE aaeE ae The dominant A gene bay black restricts black to the points, creating a bay.

    The recessive Agouti gene (a) does not restrict the black, resulting in an all-black horse.

    Therefore, foals with the genotype AA or Aa will be bay and those with the aa genotype will be black, providing they have the dominant Extension gene.

    The Extension locus interacts with the Agouti to restrict or allow the expression of black, but unlike the bay gene, it is the recessive form of the Extension loci that does not allow the color.

    As a result, a foal inheriting two copies of the recessive black gene (ee) will be completely sorrel or chestnut, regardless of what type of Agouti alleles it carries.

    In his book Equine Color Genetics, Dr.

    Philip Sponenberg describes the Agouti and Extension loci as switches.

    As a way to remember the effect each gene has on a horse’s color, one can imagine that the Extension locus determines if the horse is “chestnut” or “not chestnut.” If the horse is “not chestnut,” then the Agouti locus acts as a switch to determine if the horse is “bay” or “black.” Understanding how the A and E genes work to create the bay color and affect the occurrence of sorrel and black will help you to better determine how other coat colors are created.

    However, there are still many subtle shades of the bay coat that cannot fully be explained by the action of the A and E genes.

    Bays range in color from dark mahogany bays to blood bays to golden bays.

    These bay shades are thought to be under complex, multifactor genetic control.

    Even environment and nurture can cause a variation in coat color, with well-fed horses having a deeper, richer coat than those lacking in nutrition.

    Again, Sponenberg says these variations can be viewed as switches that trigger either a “dark,” “middle” or “light” shade.

    Regardless of the many color variations, bay foals are all born with black tips on their ears.

    In addition, most of have black manes and tails; however, their legs may be light at birth and later shed to black. Bay Reviewing the rules To review, the basic rules for producing colors are: • It usually takes at least one light-colored parent to produce a light-colored foal. • Chestnut and sorrel, when mated to one another, can produce only more chestnuts and sorrels. • Bay mated to bay, black or chestnut/sorrel can produce bay, chestnut, sorrel, and, rarely, black. • Black mated to black produces black (or, rarely, chestnut or sorrel). • Black mated to bay will usually produce a bay, fairly commonly produces chestnut or sorrel, and only rarely produces black. • Black mated to chestnut will usually produce bay, but also chestnut or sorrel, and, rarely, black.

    Color prediction is never 100 percent accurate.

    The best way to maximize the chance of a specific dark color is to test for the Agouti gene or to mate two parents of that color.

    Any other approach drastically decreases the probability of achieving the desired color in the foal. APHA Coat Color Genetics Guide • 9 Black and Brown Horses The black coat color is controlled by the E gene.

    It is the expression of the dominant E gene.

    The homozygous black horse (EE) has a very rich, black coat that is sometimes called jet black or coal black.

    Black horses have an entirely black coat and their color does not fade out over the flanks in the summer.

    Though they are recognized by APHA as a separate color, brown horses are also genetically controlled by the E gene.

    Brown horses have black or nearly black coats with brown or reddish hairs on the muzzle or flanks.

    Black is a popular color with many breeders, but it is fairly rare.

    The most reliable way to produce black horses is by mating two homozygous black horses.

    Breeding two heterozygous blacks is the second choice and breeding a black to any other color horse that carries a black gene is third.

    The reason for this is that the E gene is dominant over the e and the CCcr genes that are present in palominos.

    Fortunately, breeders can have their black or brown horse tested for the recessive e gene so that they can determine if it is homozygous (EE) or heterozygous (Ee).

    The problem with breeding black to sorrel is that many red horses carry the A gene, which turns the black coat to bay.

    According to statistics, a heterozygous black and a chestnut should produce a black foal 50 percent of the time.

    However, this is valid only if the chestnut horse (ee) does not carry the A gene.

    If the chestnut parent is heterozygous for this A gene, 50 percent of the blacks will become bays.

    If it is homozygous for this gene, 100 percent of the foals will be bay.

    Black foals are usually born with a blue-gray hue to their coat and will typically shed to black as weanlings or yearlings. Chestnut Sorrel Chestnut and Sorrel Horses

    Read more about Type : Overo Typical Overo Patterns The second generally accepted type of….:

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    Colic : colic dental fluorosis decreased serum thyroxin osteomegaly as hyperostosis and….

    Bracelet charm - horse [fits Pandora bracelet] - Jewellery - Gifts Horses-store.comColic : colic dental fluorosis decreased serum thyroxin osteomegaly as hyperostosis and….

    Allergy in horses from artificially fluoridated water 89 ALLERGY IN HORSES FROM ARTIFICIALLY FLUORIDATED WATER Cathy Justus,a Lennart P Krookb Pagosa Springs, CO, and Ithaca, NY, USA SUMMARY: As described recently in Fluoride, horses on artificially fluoridated water (AFW) developed chronic fluoride poisoning.

    This report describes an allergic manifestation as an addition to the classical signs of fluorosis, viz., urticaria.

    The skin lesions disappeared promptly when an affected horse was removed from AFW and returned promptly when the horse was returned to AFW.

    These reversible changes attest to the highly allergenic potential of fluoride. Keywords: Allergy to fluoride; Artificially fluoridated water; Chronic fluorosis; Fluoride allergy in horses; Horses and fluoride; Urticaria from fluoride.

    INTRODUCTION Recently in this journal we reported fluoride poisoning in horses from drinking artificially fluoridated water (AFW).1 The horses exhibited classical signs of chronic fluorosis, viz., colic, dental fluorosis, decreased serum thyroxin, osteomegaly as hyperostosis and endostosis, hoof deformities, and fluoride retention in bone tissue.

    Here we add allergy as another expression of fluorosis in horses.

    Allergy or hypersensitivity to fluoride is well documented in humans,2 and it has been reported in laboratory studies on rabbits and guinea pigs3 and confirmed in guinea pigs.4 However, experimental studies in cattle and sheep,5 and in cattle,6,7 as well as reports of fluorosis under field conditions in dairy cows and cattle,8,9 do not mention allergy as a result of exposure to fluoride, nor does Effects of Fluorides in Animals, an official US Government publication.10 MATERIALS AND METHODS The senior author CJ owns and operates a Quarter horse farm in Pagosa Springs, CO, USA.

    Artificially fluoridated water (AFW) was introduced into the community in the 1980s and was the only source of water for the horses.

    It was also essentially the only source of fluoride, since the horses were not fed a fluoride-containing calcium-phosphorus mineral mix, nor was their roughage contaminated by fluoride-containing fertilizer.

    Altogether, over the years eleven horses were exposed to the AFW.

    Allergy to the water was noted in two of the horses in the form of skin lesions, documented with photographs, which form the basis of this report. PRESENT FINDINGS Case 1 of skin allergy occurred in a female Quarter horse.

    Born and raised in New Mexico, this filly was brought to the farm at age 7 months.

    After two months on AFW she developed urticaria over much of her body. (Urticaria in humans: “A vascular reaction of the skin marked by the transient appearance of smooth, slightly elevated patches, which are redder or paler than the surrounding skin and often attended by severe itching.

    The eruption rarely lasts longer than two days, but may exist in chronic form.”11).

    The lesions observed here were annular and aFor correspondence: Cathy Justus, 135 Dandelion Court, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147 USA; Email: justusoriginals@pagosa.net; bLennart P Krook, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA; E-mail: lpk3@cornell.edu 90 Research report Fluoride 39(2)89–94 April-June 2006 Allergy in horses from artificially fluoridated water

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    Our ranch usually does have a few well broke Clydesdales for sale

    Guardian Stable Bedding - For the Horse Horses-store.com Our ranch usually does have a few well broke Clydesdales for sale

    Dr.

    W.E.

    Julien High Meadow Farm 11515 N.84th St.

    Omaha, NE 68122 Phone: (402) 571-5591 Email: wejulien@biovance.com Description: High Meadow Farm is located just north of Omaha, Nebraska.

    We actively breed, show and market, registered Shorthorn Cattle as well as Oxford, Cotswold and Border Leicester Sheep.

    Our equine program has focused on the Morgan, and Andalusian breeds with the relatively recent additions of black Shires and Clydesdales.

    We have attempted to put together some of the best American, Canadian and British bloodlines to produce black Clydesdales that will work on the line, or in a hitch.

    We are standing at stud, Y Knaught Laird Andrew, an outstanding black son of Armageddon’s Lord Ephraim. Dr.

    Jean Lambert Double “L” Clydesdales 1665 Rue Turmel Ancienne-Lorette, Quebec CN G2E 3J7 Phone: (418) 872-5253 Email: suzanne1@videotron.ca Description: We are a small breeding operation.

    We show at five shows per year.

    Owner of the two wonderful American stallions: Iron Horse Lady’s Fyre: Sire: SBH Phoenix Dam: Pinnacle’s Lady Jane and Great American Thomas Jefferson: Sire: BFC Dante’s Triton Dam: Grandview Eli’s Intrigue.

    Our mare is TFC Lady Eva, who is Hillmoor Fusilier’s daughter.

    Centerline’s Gypsy Lady placed 3 out of 22 registered mares in the cart class at the WCS 2007.

    Many time champions include Great American Molly Pitcher, Great American Ben Franklin’s daughter, Cedarlane Crystal Ice, and Wellington’s Delightful Diva, who is Green Leaf Royal Flush’s daughter.

    Harding’s Top Gun’s Belle is in the Ontario Futurity Program in 2012.

    We are proud sponsors for the World Clydesdale Show 2011. rd Calvin & Judy Larson Larson’s Famous Clydesdales W12654 Reeds Corner Road Ripon, WI. 54871 Email: larsonsclydesdales@yahoo.com Website: www.larsonsclydesdales.com Description: Larson’s Famous Clydesdales is a family operation.

    We have shown quality registered Clydesdales in a six horse hitch and by halter for going on 31 years.

    Our ranch usually does have a few well broke Clydesdales for sale.

    Check our web page listed above to keep up with the latest information. Russ Larson Carriage Stone Farm 10489 Music Street Newbury, OH 44065 Email: csfclydesdales@gmail.com Description: Carriage Stone Farm has been in the Clyde business since 1992.

    We breed, train, show, and sell young horses.

    We are currently not standing a stallion, but we do have several young horses for sale from our last stallion, SBH Shea’s Legacy.

    These mares and foals are in all various stages of training and all have show ring experience in halter, cart, or team.

    Some are even taking riding lessons with an eventing trainer! We are located in NW Ohio, ½ hour sout off I90 just south of Chardon.

    Feel free to contact us for more details and availability. Barry D.

    Leonard Quail Creek Farms, Inc. 1151 Rockcrusher Road Lexington, NC. 27292 Phone: (336) 798-1828 Email: BDLCPA@lexcominc.net Description: Our farm is located just off I-85 between Charlotte and Greensboro, North Carolina.

    We usually have 2 to 3 beautiful Clydes for sale.

    We handle all our horses daily and pride ourselves on the gentle approach.

    Give us a call as we would like to show you what we have and how we treat and train God’s most beautiful creation. Chuck Lewter Chadeau Mountain Clydesdales 20038 Dennison Rd.

    Tehachapi, CA. 93561 Phone: (661) 333-3519 Email: chuck@clydesdales.net Website: www.chuck.clydesdales.net Description: Home of Robyncroft Perfect Son, one of the top breeding stallions in North America and 2008 Reserve AllAmerican Stallion.

    An Ayton Perfection Grandson with Cawdor Cup winners as sire and grand sire, Sonny’s pedigree is unbeatable .

    If pedigree is what you’re looking for, look no further.

    Shipped semen is available.

    We attend most Western Region shows and usually have a quality foal or two for sale.

    Please visit our website for up to date information and photos of our horses.

    Also, don’t hesitate to call or email for any Clydesdale inquiries, including locating services.

    We can help find the perfect Clydesdale for you. Steve Lofty Steve Lofty Farms 365 Rebecca Dr.

    Whitwell, TN 37397 Phone: (423) 903-1575 Email: slofty2279@aol.com Website: www.SteveLoftyFarms.com — Description: We are located in North Central Indiana.

    Our herd sire is Ozark’s Royal Cornerstone with strong bloodlines on both top and bottom.

    Please call to make sure we will be home for your visit. Michael & Elizabeth Marks De Martino Dream Catcher Farm 19050 S.E. 47th Place Morriston, FL. 32668 Phone: (352) 812-5390 Email: clydesdale@mindspring.com Website: http//clydesdale.home.mindspring.com Description: Dream Catcher Farm located in North Central Florida, home of the Blue Mountain Clydesdales .

    With over twenty years of experience with the Clydesdale breed, our goal is to breed for quality, grace, and of course, love.

    Our new herd sire: Blue Mountain Piper (grandson of English Tartan Piper).

    We feel confident he will produce all these qualities. Blaine & Trinda Martin PO Box 388 Strathclair, Manitoba CN R0J 2C0 Phone: (204) 365-5279 Mike, Dona, and Ben McGilvray McGilvray Farms 1485 Road 28.5 Bird City, KS. 67731 Phone: (785) 734-2663 or (970) 380-9151 Email: mcgilvrayfarms@yahoo.com Website: www.sandhillclydes.com Description: Clydesdales for sale.

    See our website for horses, carriages, buggies, or wagons.

    We repair and build wooden wagon wheels. William & Barbara McKnew Little Giants P.O.

    Box 2170 Bowie, MD 20718 Phone: (301) 372-3893 Email: info@littlegiantsllc.com Website: www.littlegiantsllc.com Description: Little Giants is a family run Clydesdale breeding operation located in Southern Maryland.

    They maintain a herd of 25-30 registered Clydesdales.

    Little Giants breeds top quality Clydesdales.

    They currently stand the stallions: Little Giants David #21454 and Deighton Major #24166.

    Little Giants Clydesdales can be seen throughout the year at various shows In-Hand, Under Harness, Under Saddle – English & Western, Fox Hunting, and Trail Riding.

    Little Giants also breeds a few select Registered Warmbloods.

    Little Giants offers a wide variety of horses for sale.

    Call or check out their website. Doug & Tina Miller Ebony Clydes 8156 Dolphin Rd Tomah, WI. 54660 Phone: (608) 343-2613 or (608) 343-2615 Email: ebonyclydes@localnet.com Website: www.ebonyclydes.com Description: We are a family farm breeding, working, showing, and selling black Clydesdales.

    In 2011, we will stand Canadian bred stallions Donegal Black Diamond & Willishome Lord Gallagher (son’s of Armageddon’s Lord Cain) and American bred Midnight Majestic Mack (son of Donegal Midnight Lignite).

    We have 10-15 broodmares carrying the bloodlines of Donegal Midnight Lignite, Westerdale Winston, Grandview Sir El Capitan, Bluie Beau Gabriel, Keyhole Dillon, Joseph’s Lake Gunsmoke, Armageddon’s Lord Cain, Greendyke’s Royal, Willoway Black Jeff, Donegal Enhancer and Donegal Magnificent.

    We raise 10-12 foals each year, and most are for sale along with a selection of older horses.

    Call, email, or just stop in.

    We love to talk “horse”. **We have also just open our horse motel for those of you needing a place for your horse to hang his halter for a night or two while on the road. Dr. & Mrs.

    Michael D.

    Moleski Armageddon Clydesdales 733 East Kinter Road Bronson, MI. 49028 Phone: (517) 369-3535 Email: moleskicl@cbpu.com Website: www.cbpu.com/moleskicl/ Description: We are long-term breeders and exhibitors of Clydesdales, almost all black.

    Nearly always have black breeding stock available to sell, having six or seven foals a year most of which are for sale. Larry Moss Family Wolf Mound Farms – Moss Clydesdales Matthew Moss, Manager 14999 E. 1500 Rd.

    Paris, IL. 61944 Phone: (217) 465-4545 Fax: (217) 465-4505 Website: www.mossclydesdales.com Email: info@mossclydesdales.com or mmoss@mossclydesdales.com — Ty & Alicia Thorson Northrich Clydesdales N6848 Box Elder Road Shawano, WI 54166 Ty’s Phone: (715) 853-4281 Alicia’s Phone: (715) 853-4241 Email: thorson@frontiernet.net Description: Northrich Clydesdales is home to quality black and bay Clydesdales in the heart of Northeastern Wisconsin.

    We have on farm stallion service available along with foals and horses for sale.come visit us anytime, just give us a call. Cynthia L.

    Torbeck Diamond T Ranch Rt. 2 Box 65 –G1 Harrisville, WV. 26362 Phone: (304) 643-4575 Email: CLTorbeck@aol.com Description: Quality Clydes nestled in the hills of West Virginia.

    Owner of Freedom Royal Elliot, who placed 2nd at the 2007 World Clydesdale Show! Randy & Linda Torres Family Torres Farms 1681 Farlin Rd.

    Alpine, CA. 91901 Home Phone: (619) 602-1753 Email: sddentsplus@aol.com Description: Torres farms is located in Alpine, a small town east of San Diego, up against the Cleveland National Forest.

    We raise black and bay Clydesdales.

    Proud of our stock, we stand at stud Sunny Creek Black Prince and several well bred mares, producing a few quality foals a year.

    As a family we train, ride, drive, and show our magnificent Clydesdales.

    We have a few quality Clydesdales for sale, email or give us a call.

    Website coming soon! Jeanne Williams Laurelvale Clydesdales 15757 E.

    Sargent Rd.

    Lodi, CA 95240 Phone: (209) 727-0200 Email: Jeanne@sargentequest.com Website: www.laurelvaleclydesdales.com Description: Laurelvale Clydesdales is located in Northern California (between Sacramento & San Francisco).

    We have a small select “herd” of Clydesdales including broodmares, stallions, geldings, and foals.

    Owned and operated by Jeanne Williams, “my goal is to raise quality Clydesdales with a good balanced conformation, clean/flat hocks, wide heel, good feather, and a great disposition”.

    Jeanne is dedicated to the Clydesdales and enjoys breeding, competing, and sharing this beautiful, majestic breed of horse.

    For more information (including horses for sale and stallions) browse the website.

    Feel free to call with questions or drop by if you are in the area. Mark L.

    Winter MD Wyndale Ranch 15401 N FM 2528 Lubbock, TX. 79415 Phone: (806) 747-6090 Email: wyndale0845@speednet.com Description: Quality Clydesdales located in West Texas. Marion Young Doura Clydesdales R.R #1 – 113 Old Bridge Rd.

    Hanover, Ontario, Canada N4N 3B8 Phone: (519)364-7051 Email: douraclydesdale@everus.ca Description: Breeder, importer, and exporter of quality Clydesdales.

    Available for custom work at home, at your location, or on the show circuit.

    Owner & Editor of “The Clydesdale Speculator”, a quality Clydesdale magazine in its eighth year of publication.

    Available by subscription. Shelby Zarobinsky, & Dawn & Steve Matthews Sandy Acres Clydesdales 10032 N Ruby Rd.

    Laporte, IN 46350 Phone: (219) 393-0655 Email: sandyacresclydesdales@yahoo.com Website: www.sandyacresclydesdales.weebly.com Description: We are a family owned farm located in Northwestern Indiana and own a few horses.

    We try to have something for sale most of the time and work with mostly young horses.

    Our family travels the Midwest showing in halter classes and participating in many junior classes with our youth showmen.

    Occasionally, if we have enough help, we show in cart classes with a home trained horse.

    Contact us if you are interested in purchasing a horse or are interested in getting your child under 18 involved in showing or stop by to visit any time!

    Read more about Our ranch usually does have a few well broke Clydesdales for sale:

    Equestrian Products – Guardian Horse Bedding, Equiderma Skin Products, Equilinn Sports Bra

    Other Sources:

  • Horse – American Museum of Natural History
  • Western saddles; Billy Cook, Circle Y , Tucker & used western trail …
  • Dark Horse Comics
  • Equestrian Products – Guardian Horse Bedding, Equiderma Skin Products, Equilinn Sports Bra, Learn more about Guardian Stable Bedding – For the Horse Horses-store.com HERE:

    Horses-Store.com and  Our ranch usually does have a few well broke Clydesdales for sale

    Horses-Store.com - Our ranch usually does have a few well broke Clydesdales for sale

    Horses-Store.com and  Our ranch usually does have a few well broke Clydesdales for sale

    Horses-Store.com - Our ranch usually does have a few well broke Clydesdales for sale

    Horses For : 12 A Noncommercial Stable is any building or structure accessory….

    GIFT VOUCHER Horses-store.comHorses For : 12 A Noncommercial Stable is any building or structure accessory….

    COUNTY ZONING AND HORSES IN MARYLAND Whether you want to keep your own horse on your residential property, or run a commercial (profit or nonprofit) equine facility, you need to know what your county requires when it comes to zoning.

    Zoning is not a function of the state, but rather determined by your county government.

    Additionally, some counties may require additional permitting or licenses if you board horses other than your own on your property.

    Remember, too, stable licensing is required by Maryland State law.

    Applications for licensing and an update on the changes to licensing regulations and penalties can be obtained on the Maryland Horse Industry Board’s website: www.mda.maryland.gov/horseboard.

    This is just a preliminary guide to help you get started on finding the zoning information you may need.

    The information contained herein is for general knowledge, it may not be all inclusive, and it is not meant to be a substitute for legal counsel or other professional advice.

    Remember that laws and regulations can, and do, change.

    It is your responsibility to know which laws and regulations govern your equine activities.

    Zoning is county-specific, so do not rely on a friend (or even a neighbor) to give you current county requirements.

    KNOW for certain.

    It is your responsibility to understand the laws and regulations governing the keeping of horses on your property and within which category of zoning your property lies.

    Without exception, you must be located in an area zoned for agriculture use to keep a horse on your property for commercial purposes; although special exceptions are sometimes granted.

    Most counties permit horses on residential property, but there are minimal acreage requirements and specific setback regulations you must comply with first.

    You can find most counties’ agricultural and land use information online at Maryland Department of Agriculture http://www.mda.state.md.us/on web/ag links/countyag.php .

    The information found on this website is a compilation of resources from the counties’ websites.

    Another great resource for locating your county zoning regulations can be found online at http://www.smadc.com/tutorials/zoningINFO.html, a “Zoning Tutorial for New Farming Enterprises” (A Maryland FarmLINK Assistance Guide).

    Keep in mind that each county presents its regulations and code in similar, but unique, formats.

    The “Zoning Tutorial for New Farming Enterprises” also has general information on property uses, district maps, and general zoning definitions.

    Within this report, you will find under each county heading a summary of zoning and land use definitions relevant to horse ownership, stable management, and equine activities.

    Horses are sometimes defined as livestock, and sometimes not defined at all.

    Not all counties specify minimal acreage requirements for maintaining a horse on one’s own property.

    If a county’s code is ambiguous or silent on the property use for horses, it is best to contact the Zoning and/or Land Use department of that county for guidance.

    Ignorance of the law can result in costly fines and penalties.

    There are numerous definitions not included in this summary that may relate to your particular property use.

    Be sure to check out the definitions first when searching through the county codes.

    All of the counties have adopted or incorporated portions of “Right to Farm” legislative language into their county’s zoning ordinances; recognizing the significant contributions of agricultural activities, providing protection of a person’s right to farm or to engage in agricultural activities, and facilitating agricultural and non-agricultural citizens in co-existing and resolving disputes directly related to agricultural activities. 1 Keep in mind that your county’s zoning code currently could be in the process of being re-written.

    Use this information as a guide when contacting your county zoning or permitting agencies and ask if any changes have been made to the code (since 2012) that would have a substantive change to the equestrian provisions noted below.

    Cautionary Note: The website addresses below (as found through the “Zoning Tutorial”) do not always go directly to the county government’s website.

    The link may take you via a third-party service provider to the county code language.

    ALLEGHANY – http://www.gov.allconet.org/permits/laws/Zoning%20Regulations Part%20IV 021010 public.pdf (1) “Agricultural Operation” includes (but not limited to) all matters set forth in the Alleghany County Right to Farm, including management of livestock. (2) An “Agricultural Structure” is any structure associated with agricultural use. (3) Stables must acquire a special exceptions permit in G-1 districts (general urban residential) from the Board of Appeals. (4) Stables are permitted in A districts (agricultural).

    ANNE ARUNDEL – http://www.aacounty.org/PlanZone/Zoning/Index.cfm (1) “Animal” is defined as any vertebrate species of animal (other than human) including livestock. (2) “Boarding” means keeping an animal overnight in a commercial establishment. (3) “Commercial establishment” is a facility (establishment) whose primary function is to sell a product or service. (4) The definition of a “domesticated animal” includes a horse. (5) “Farming” means the use of land for agricultural purposes (including animal husbandry). (6) “Facility” means a building or property (other than a private residence) in which an animal is maintained. (7) “Farm” means land of 20 acres or more, all or part of which is used in commercial cultivation or for raising animals. (8) “Stables, commercial, community, and riding club” means a facility used for the unsupervised hiring out of horses owned by the facility. (9) Construction permits are not required for agricultural buildings as long as they meet the guidelines established in the new law that took effect July 1, 2012.

    Most private or boarding barns and indoor riding arenas are exempt if they are on farms with current Anne Arundel County Soil Conservation District farm plans.

    Erosion and Sediment Control Plans, however, may be necessary and can be obtained through the Soil Conservation District.

    Check with the County if you intend to construct, alter, demolish, repair, enlarge, move, convert or change any existing building on your property. (10) A facility for a commercial or community stable or riding club with up to 2 horses must be on a lot of at least 2 acres, plus 20,000 square feet for each horse in excess of 2 horses; structures must be located at least 50’ from any nonresidential lot line and 200’ from any residentially zoned property line; and manure must be stored at least 100 feet from any lot line.

    BALTIMORE – http://www.ecode360.com/12101075 (1) “Agricultural, Commercial” means the use of land, including ancillary structures and buildings…and includes, among other activities, animal husbandry, the operation of an equestrian center, horse breeding and horse training. 2 (2) An “Equestrian Center” consists of 200 or more contiguous acres of land, which is owned and operated by an organization qualified as a nonprofit (IRS definition of 501(c)3) and is used primarily for equestrian activities.

    Equestrian activities include horse riding, horse training, horse racing, horse showing, dressage, stadium jumping, cross country jumping, carriage competitions, and any and all other equine activities and events. (3) A “Farm” is described as having 3 acres or more of land and used primarily for commercial agriculture, but does NOT including riding stables. (4) A “Riding Stable” or “Public Stable” is an accessory building and/or other building, where horses are kept for livery or hire; requires special exception permit. (5) A “Private Stable” is an accessory building used only for stabling or keeping of horses (not more than 3 in number) for private use only and not for livery or hire. (6) Non-commercial land use for keeping a horse requires 1 acre of grazing or pasture land per animal. (7) Non-commercial land use for keeping ponies or miniature horses requires 1 acre of grazing or pasture land per 2 animals.

    CALVERT – http://www.co.cal.md.us/business/planning/2006zoningordinance/ (1) “Agriculture” is defined in part as the use of land for agricultural purposes including animal husbandry. (2) “Agricultural Activity” includes the grazing and raising of livestock. (3) “Agritourism” is the act of visiting a working farm to engage in outdoor recreation, participate in educational experiences, or enjoy entertainment and hospitality services. (4) An “Agritourism Enterprise” includes activities on a working farm and offered to the public or to invited groups for the purpose of recreation, education, or active involvement in a farm operation. (5) “Agritourism Use” is a commercial enterprise located on a working farm, and related to the activities on that farm, intended to attract tourists and provide supplemental income for the farm owner.

    Agritourism uses include, but are not limited to, horseback riding. (6) “Animal Husbandry” is the care and/or breeding of livestock on a farm and raised for sale or profit, including but not limited to horses. (7) Horses (and other livestock) are defined as “pets” if maintained on non-farm property as a pet rather than for its productive value. (8) Riding arenas and corrals that are offered for commercial entertainment or recreation are considered an “Outdoor Recreation Facility.” (9) A “Commercial or NonProfit Stable or Horseback-Riding Club” is an establishment in which horses are kept, trained, boarded, handled, or ridden for a fee. (10) “Commercial” is defined as any activity where goods or services are sold or traded with the expectation of profit or gain. (11) “Commercial or Club Stable” is any building or land where horses are kept for hire, sale, boarding, riding, or show. (12) A “Noncommercial Stable” is any building or structure, accessory to the principal use of a residence, that shelters horses for the exclusive use of the occupant of the premises, or any building or land where horses are bred, raised or trained on a farm by the occupants for pleasure, show or racing. (13) A “farm” is a parcel of land not less than 20 acres in size used for agricultural purposes, receiving agricultural use assessment from the Maryland Dept.

    Of Assessment and Taxation and/or within a recorded Agricultural Preservation District. 3 (14) Land use for animal husbandry requires a minimum of 3 acres, and the property qualifies for Agricultural Use Assessment; animal husbandry is permitted in FFD, APD, and RC districts, and conditionally permitted in RCD, RD, and HD districts. (15) Land use for commercial, nonprofit, or horseback riding clubs (establishments where horses are kept, trained, boarded, handled, or ridden for a fee) requires a minimum of 5 acres and is conditionally permitted in FFD, RCD, APD, HD, and RC districts. (16) Conditional and special permitted is required for livestock auctions (including horses) by commercial establishments, non-profit organizations, and private persons, but only in FFD, RCD, APD, HD, I-1, and RC districts.

    CAROLINE – http://www.ecode360.com/8726812 (1) “Agriculture” is defined in part as the use of land for agricultural purposes including animal husbandry. (2) An “Animal” is defined as every non-human species, both domestic and wild, including but not limited to dogs, cats, horses, reptiles, birds, livestock and fowl. (3) A “Farm Animal” is an animal kept or raised on a farm for use and profit, including livestock and fowl. (4) “Animal husbandry” is defined as the raising, boarding, and/or sale of domestic animals other than dogs or cats. (5) A “Farm” is a parcel of land not less than 20 acres in size, used for agriculture, and receives agricultural use assessment from the Maryland Dept.

    Of Assessment and Taxation and/or within a recorded Agricultural Preservation District. (6) “Commercial” is defined as any activity where goods or services are sold or traded with the expectation of profit or gain. (7) “Commercial or Club Stable” is any building or land where horses are kept for hire, sale, boarding, riding, or show. (8) A “Noncommercial Stable” is any building or structure, accessory to the principal use of a residence, that shelters horses for the exclusive use of the occupant of the premises, or any building or land where horses are bred, raised or trained on a farm by the occupants for pleasure, show or racing. (9) “Generally Accepted Practice” is the term used to describe any practice generally accepted in the agricultural community, horse industry, and sporting dog community, as applied to the community as a whole and not confined to any particular segment or breed of the industry or community. (10) Livestock Auction and Sales Barns must have a special use exception granted for A and R districts; and with site plan approval in HC, C-2, and I-2 districts. (11) Commercial Stables are permitted in A district; permitted with site plan approval in C-1 and C-2 districts, and must obtain a special use exception in OS, R, R-1, HC, and I-2 districts. (12) Non-commercial stables are permitted in all districts.

    CARROLL – http://ccgovernment.carr.org/ccg/code/index.asp (1) “Agricultural” or “Agricultural Purposes” includes the raising of farm products for use or sale, including livestock husbandry, … and including stables for boarding and training horses. (2) “Boarding Stable” is a structure in which more than 2 horses or ponies are housed, boarded, or kept for consideration. (3) A “Riding Academy” is defined as an establishment where horses and ponies are boarded and cared for; where instruction in riding, jumping, and showing may be offered, or where the general public, for a fee, may hire horses for riding. 4 (4) A “Commercial Stable” is a boarding stable or a riding academy. (5) A “Private Stable” is an accessory structure designed for the shelter, feeding, and care of no more than 5 horses, ponies, or other livestock, maintained on the property as pets or for domestic use, as distinguished from agricultural or commercial stables. (6) Private stables must have 3 acres or more and require a 75’ setback from property lines of the structure. (7) Saddlery and tack shops are considered accessory if located on the premises of a riding academy, boarding stable, or horse farm. (8) Commercial stables require a 200’ setback and must be on 3 or more acres.

    CECIL – http://www.ccgov.org/uploads/PlanningAndZoning/General/ZoningOrdinance 2011.pdf (1) “Agriculture” is deemed to include general farming and all uses commonly classed as agricultural, and includes the feeding, housing, and maintaining horses. (2) “Animal husbandry” is defined as the raising, boarding, and/or sale of domestic animals other than dogs or cats. (3) Activities where goods and services are sold or traded with the expectation of profit or gain are considered “commercial” in nature. (4) A “Commercial Stable” is permitted conditionally in NAR, SAR, RR, LDR, ST, VR, and OS zones provided any building is setback 100’ from nearest property line.commercial stables are unconditionally permitted in BL, BG, BI, M1, and M2 districts. (5) “Animal Husbandry” activities are conditionally permitted in NAR, SAR, RR, LDR, ST, UR, VR, M1, M2, MEA and OS zones; minimum lot size of 1 acre. (6) The definition of “Festival or Events” includes horse shows as an occasional outdoor festival or event. (7) “Youth Camp” includes a publicly or privately owned facility that provides indoor or outdoor activities for children and whose activities may include horseback riding.

    CHARLES – http://gcp.esub.net/cgi-bin/om isapi.dll?clientID=62362&infobase=ch0836.nfo&softpage=Browse Frame Pg42 (1) “Animal” is defined as every nonhuman species of animal, both domestic and wild, including but not limited to dogs, cats, livestock and fowl. (2) Private horse stables providing for 2 or more horses shall have a setback of 75’ from any public road or lotline.

    Pastures, when fenced, may extend to the lot line.

    A minimum of 1 acre per animal is required. (3) Pens, stalls and runs for animals shall not be located within 50’ of any adjacent residential line. (4) Horses maintained as pets are Conditionally Permitted in all zones, except BP district, must be on a minimum of 2 acres. (5) Commercial stables are considered any stable for the housing of horses or other equines, operates for remuneration, hire, sale, or stabling or any stable, not related to the ordinary operation of a farm, within a capacity for more than 4 equine. (6) Commercial stables may operate with a Special Exception in RC(D), RR, RL, RM, CV, PRD, and MX zones; must be greater than 5 acres and a setback of 100’ for all structures.

    DORCESTER – http://ecode360.com/DO0950 (1) “Agricultural Use” is land devoted to the practice of agriculture. (2) “Agriculture” is considered all methods of production and management of livestock; includes but not limited to the housing and maintaining of horses. 5 (3) “Commercial” is any activity conducted with the intent of realizing a profit from the sale of goods or services. (4) “Noncommercial” is any activity conducted for personal use or enjoyment without the intent of realizing a profit or recovering costs through the sale of goods or services. (5) A “Farm” is defined as land which is primarily used for such bona fide agricultural purposes as crop production, livestock pasturage, care, handling, etc.

    And directly related uses. (6) Horse barns (commercial) are permitted in all districts except SR, SR-RCA. (7) Riding and boarding stables must have a minimum 10 acres or 1 acre per animal, whichever is greater; 200’ setback for stables; special exception granted in RC, RR-C, and AC districts. (8) Non-commercial stables are accessory structures for residential zones; must have 3 acres minimum, 200’ setback for the stable, and storage of manure must be more than 50’ from property line; allowed as an accessory in all districts except B-1, B-2, I-1, and I-2.

    FREDERICK – http://frederickcountymd.gov/index.aspx?NID=174 (1) “Agricultural Activity” includes the raising of farm products for use or sale, including livestock husbandry, equine farms (including stables for boarding and training horses).

    Permitted use in all districts, site development plan required. (2) “Agricultural Activity, Limited” means the keeping of farm animals in residential districts on lots with less than 3 acres.

    Special exception permit required in R1, R3, R5, R8, R12, and R16 districts. (3) “Animal” specifically includes animals used for agricultural purposes. (4) “Commercial Operation” is any establishment operating as a business including boarding stables and sales barns. (5) “Equine Activities” is defined as those activities including teaching equestrian skills, participating in equestrian competitions, exhibitions or other displays of equestrian skill, as well as the caring for, breeding, boarding, riding, or training horses.

    Arenas are permitted in conjunction with an equine activity, shall not be located in the front yard, and shall be setback 100’ from all property lines.

    Lighting for outdoor arenas shall not exceed 30’ in height and is subject to regulations for lighting type and illumination standards. (6) A “Farm” is considered a parcel of land not less than 25 acres in size on which an agricultural activity is conducted. (7) “Farm Animals” are those animals ordinarily found on a farm, including but not limited to, horses, ponies, etc. (8) Farm animals maintained on residential property requires a minimum of 3 acres or more, 50’ setback from all property lines, and must acquire an accessory use permit. (9) A “Guest Farm” is a farm used for temporary rental accommodations of no more than 4 guest rooms, which may include meals for guests only, for the purpose of experiencing farm or ranch activities including horseback riding. (10) A “Horse Tack” or “Saddlery Shop” include activities of retail sale of tack or equipment for horses (such as saddles or harnesses); site development plan required for zoning purposes in VC, MX, and GC districts; accessory to a commercial boarding stable in an agricultural district.; cannot be more than 25% of commercial boarding stable main building floor area. (11) “Rodeo” is the use of property for exhibitions featuring animal riding, roping, steer wrestling, bull riding or similar sporting events featuring animals. (12) A “Tenant Farmhouse” is a single-family detached dwelling or a separate dwelling unit within the principal structure located on a farm. 6 GARRETT – http://www.co.garrett.md.us/PlanningLand/PlanningZoning/Zoning.aspx (1) The Garrett County Planning & Land Development Office consists of two separate divisions.

    The Planning, Zoning & Licensing Division handles all questions concerning zoning, licensing issues, subdivision, comprehensive planning, sensitive area regulations, land preservation, mapping, and census date.

    The Permits and Inspection Division handles all questions concerning building code administration, stormwater management, entrance permits, and sediment and erosion control. (2) The County adopted land use regulations for Deep Creek Watershed area, but not the remaining portion of the county; Accident, Friendsville, Grantsville, Loch Lynn Heights, Mountain Lake Park, and Oakland, located in the unregulated area, have adopted their own zoning regulations. (3) Erecting most structures requires a zoning permit, as does changing the use of land or buildings in a zoned area.

    New buildings and additions (such as fences, signs, and small sheds) may not require a building permit, but do require zoning approval. (4) Other than the “Right to Farm” legislation incorporated into the County’s regulations, the County does not have any specific regulations regarding acreage and horses.

    HARFORD – http://www.harfordcountymd.gov/PlanningZoning/Download/1303-406.pdf (1) “Agricultural Public Events” are events related to agricultural vocations, other than temporary uses already permitted, including farm tours, animal rodeos, corn mazes…and equestrian trail rentals.

    A.

    Minimum parcel area of 10 acres with an agricultural assessment.

    B.

    Minimum setback of 100’ from all property lines, except road frontage and 200’ from offsite residence.

    C.

    Must be owner or tenant operated.

    D.

    No operational hours between 10 p.m.

    And 7 a.m.

    E.

    Lighting may only be used during operational hours and must be shielded or directed away from off-site residences.

    F.

    Safe and adequate access shall be provided for vehicular traffic.

    G.

    Adequate arrangements for temporary sanitary facilities in accordance with Health Dept. (2) “Agricultural Identification Signs” are not to exceed 32 square feet in area and are not to be located less than 35’ from the center line of the road or 10’ from the road right-of-way, whichever is greater. (3) “Agricultural Resource Center” is an agriculturally oriented park which includes uses such as equine competitions and events, livestock sales and auctions, farm fairs, farmer’s markets, trail riding and support services.

    AGCs shall be granted in agricultural districts, provided that: a.

    A minimum parcel area of 100 acres is established.

    B.

    The principal access shall be provided from a collector or higher functionally classified roadway c.

    No building or structure, including temporary structures, shall be located less than 200 feet from any adjacent residential lot.

    D.

    Any outside lighting shall be designed, installed and maintained in a manner not to cause a glare or reflection on adjacent residential lots.

    E.

    Ancillary uses to the agricultural resource center are defined as office space, banquet hall and meeting rooms.

    The ancillary uses are limited to 10% of the total building square footage or 25,000 square feet, whichever is less.

    F.

    Public events are limited to 1 event per 30 calendar days, and hours of operation for public events are permitted between 6 a.m.

    And 10 p.m.

    G.

    A buffer yard is required and shall be provided adjacent to any residential lot (4) “Agricultural Services” are uses that serve or support agriculture (eg auction sales of animals). 7 (5) “Agriculture” includes all methods of production and management of livestock, crops, vegetation and soil.

    Also includes the activities of feeding, housing and maintaining animals such as horses.

    Permitted in all zoning districts. (6) “Agricultural Use” is defined as the use of any tract of land for the production of animal or plant life. (7) “Animal, Domestic” is defined as a species of mammal that is accustomed to living in or about the habitation of man and is dependent on man for food or shelter. (8) “Animal Rodeo” is any public performance featuring jousting, fox hunting, polo, horse shows, horse pulling, bronco riding, calf roping, steer wrestling, bull riding, point-to-point races and steeplechases. (9) A “Farm” is defined for purposes of the census of agriculture as any place that has, or has the potential to produce $1,000 or more in annual gross sales of agricultural products. (10) “Livestock” is considered generally accepted outdoor farm animals (ie cows, goats, horses, etc.); does not include cats, dogs, and other domestic house pets. (11) Riding stables, commercial or club shall be granted in AG district provided that a.

    No stable shall be located within 200’ of any residential lot; and b.

    A minimum parcel area of 5 acres is established. (12) “Stable, Commercial Riding” is any facility used primarily for the commercial hiring out of horses or ponies or instruction of riding where 5 or more horses are kept for these purposes.

    Special development or special exception use permitted in Agricultural districts and permitted in B-3 and C1 zones.

    A.

    Parking shall be provided a minimum of 100’ from property lines except road frontage and 200 feet from any off-site residence.

    B.

    Property on which the commercial stable is located shall be buffered (buffer yard may be included in the setback area). (13) “Stable, Private” is considered an accessory structure to the principal residential use that shelters horses for the exclusive use of the residents of the premises.

    Any stables, corrals, feeding and bedding areas for horses shall be located at least 50’ from any public road or lot line. (14) “Tenant Farmer/Tenant Operator” is an individual or business entity that is actively producing or managing livestock…and is not the owner of the property being farmed.

    An agreement for this use is usually compensated by a contract for rent, lease or on a crop sharing basis. (15) “Tenant House” is the dwelling unit located on agricultural property that is used either for occupancy by immediate members of the family owning or operating the agricultural use or by employees engaged in agricultural activities on the property.

    An agricultural tenant house includes mobile homes for bona fide farm workers when not more than one such structures is proved on parcels of 11 to 50 acres, and not more than one additional tenant house per 50 acres thereafter. (16) Signs for private traffic control (directing traffic movement onto a premises or within a premises) shall not exceed 4 square feet in area for each sign.

    HOWARD – http://www.co.ho.md.us/Departments.aspx?id=4294968162 (1) “Agribusiness” is any commercial or industrial uses that are adjunct to the agricultural economy and may be permitted as a conditional use in the RC or RR Districts. (2) “Agritourism Enterprise” includes activities conducted on a working farm and offered to the public or to invited groups for the purpose of recreation, education or active involvement in the farm operation.

    These activities must be related to agriculture or natural resources and incidental to the primary operation of the site.

    This definition includes farm tours, hay rides, corn mazes, classes related to agricultural products or skills, picnic and party facilities offered in conjunction with the above, and similar uses. (3) A “Farm” is defined as a lot or parcel principally used for farming. 8 (4) “Farming” is land used for agricultural purposes, including (among many types of uses) the breeding, raising, training, boarding, and general care of livestock for uses other than for food, such as sport or show purposes, as pets, or for recreation, and shall be considered a normal farming function (kennels are excluded from this definition). (5) “Farm Tenant House” is an accessory detached building or mobile home that is: a.

    Designed and arranged for use as a dwelling; b.

    Located on a parcel of land not less than 50 acres used for farming; c.

    One unit permitted per 25 acres of that parcel; and d.

    Occupied by at least one person who is employed by the owner or operator of the farm on which the dwelling is located to engage in farming on a full- or part-time basis. (6) “Riding Stable” and “Riding Academy” are any lot used primarily for the commercial hiring out of horses or ponies or instruction in riding where 3 or more horses are kept for these purposes.

    As a matter-of-right, stables and academies are permitted in POR, PEC, and PGCC districts.

    They are conditional permitted on preservation parcels.A conditional use for a Riding Stable or Academy may be granted in the RC or RR Districts, provided that: a.

    Adequate areas for horseback riding shall be available on the site.

    If the operation will include off-site horseback riding, the petition must indicate the location of off-site trails and include written permission from the property owners.

    B.

    Minimum required setbacks for stables and indoor or outdoor riding arenas: (i)For a use where 20 or fewer horses are kept on the property, from any property line other than a public street……………….100 feet (ii) For a use where more than 20 horses are kept on the property, from any property line other than a public street………………200 feet c.

    The site has a minimum area of 5 acres.

    D.

    Parking areas, driveways and outdoor riding areas will be located and designed to shield neighboring properties from noise, dust and odors.

    KENT – http://www.kentcounty.com/gov/planzone/contents02.php (1) “Agriculture” is defined as farming activities including, among other farm activities, the grazing and raising of livestock. (2) A “Farm” consists of a parcel of land not less than 20 acres in size used for agriculture.

    A sign is permitted in Agricultural Zoning Districts and on bona fide farms in any other district provided the one sign is limited in area to 4 square feet to identify the farm. (3) “Stable, Private” is an accessory building, not related to the ordinary operation of a farm, for the housing of not more than 4 horses or mules owned by a person or persons living on the premises and which horses or mules are not for hire or sale.

    Standards for a private stable include: a.

    A lot of 2 acres or more.

    B.

    Any structure for housing or feeding of animals shall be a minimum of 100’ from any property line.

    C.

    There shall be no more than 1 horse per acre of land.

    Only available pasture acreage shall be used to compute the number of horses allowed on a parcel.

    D.

    The operation must be managed according to waste and nutrient management plans as approved by the Natural Resources Conservation Service. (4) “Stable, Public” is any stable for the housing of horses or mules, operated for remuneration, hire, sale, or stabling, or any stable not related to the ordinary operation of a farm, with the capacity for more than 4 horses or mules, whether or not such stable is operated for remuneration, hire, sale or stabling.

    Standards for commercial stables or riding academies (eg public stable) includes: a.

    A lot size of 20 acres or more. 9 b.

    Any structure for keeping or feeding of animals and waste management structures shall be a minimum of 400’ from any property line.

    C.

    No waste management facility or structure for the keeping of animals is in the 100-year floodplain.

    D.

    The feeding and watering of animals are conducted a minimum of 100’ from tidal water and tributary streams, both tidal and non-tidal, and 50’ from non-tidal wetlands.

    E.

    The operation must be managed according to waste and nutrient management plans as approved by the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

    F.

    Parking must be provided for one parking space per two horse stalls. (5) A “Tenant House” is a farm dwelling, other than the main farmhouse, for occupancy by a person or family associated with the agricultural endeavors on the farm or by a member of the property owner’s immediate family. (6) Accessory farm buildings, including but not limited to barns and stables, are permitted on all farms in the Agricultural Zoning District.

    All structures shall be a minimum of 100’ from any property line.

    MONTGOMERY – http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll?f=templates&fn=default.htm&vid=amlegal:montgomeryco md mc (1) “Agriculture” defined as the business, science and art of cultivating and managing soil, crops, and livestock; breeding, raising, or managing livestock, including horses and equestrian events and activities. (2) “Equestrian activity” is the care, breeding, boarding, rental, riding or training of horses or the teaching of equestrian skills. (3) “Equestrian event” is a competition, exhibition, or other display of equestrian skills. (4) “Equestrian event, informal” is defined as a competitive or non-competitive event that involves between 26 and 50 participants and spectators, per day. (5) “Equestrian event, major” is defined as a competitive or non-competitive event that involves between 151 and 300 participants and spectators, per day. (6) “Equestrian event, minor” is defined as a competitive or non-competitive event that involves between 51 and 150 participants or spectators, per day. (7) “Equestrian Facility” is any building, structure, or land area that is used primarily for an equestrian activity or event.

    Permitted with some special exceptional use in R, RC, LDRC, RDT, RS, RNC, and RNC/TDR zones.

    Not permitted in certain cluster and rural open space areas in the RNC and RNC/TDR zones.

    Facilities established before April 5, 2004 are grandfathered, except must comply with nutrient management, water quality and soil conservation standards.

    In the RNC and RNC/TDR zones, a resident of a lot or parcel at least 2 acres in size may raise ride, and board horses for personal use.

    One horse is permitted for every 1 gross acre of the lot or parcel, up to a maximum of 5 horses.

    Any building or manure storage area must be located at least 100 feet from any existing dwelling on an adjacent tract of land.

    A Special Exception may be filed with Board of Appeals to deviate from permitted use standard regarding (1) number of participants/spectators, (2) number of events held each year, (3) event acreage, (4) hours of operation, and (5) road classification requirement; may be renewable. (8) In the residential zones, Equestrian Facilities are permitted as a Special Exeception use in the RE2, RE-2C, R-200, R-150, and R-90 zones.

    Any riding stable established by Special Exception in the R-90 zone before May 6, 2002 is a conforming use and may be modified, repaired, reconstructed, or enlarged at a maximum of 5% of the total floor area in accordance with the Special Exception standards in effect before May 6, 2002.

    Any riding stable, including buildings, show rings, paddocks, activities and events established by Special Exception in the RE-1, RE-2, RE-2C, R-150, R-200, or RMH-200 zones before April 5, 2004 is a conforming use and may be modified, reconstructed, or enlarged in 10 accordance with the Special Exception standards in effect after April 5, 2004 except that any riding stable existing in the RE-1, RE-2, RE-2C, R-150, R-200, or RHM-200 zones before April 5, 2004 must be in compliance with the nutrient management, water quality, and soil conservation standards of 59-G-2.49(f) no later than March 2, 2005. (9) “Paddock” is a fenced area, internal to an equestrian facility, where horses are exercised or pastured.

    Paddock fencing is not perimeter fencing of an equestrian facility. (10) Standards permitted for Equestrian Facility a.

    Equestrian Events: i.

    Events with fewer than 25 participants/spectators may take place on site of 18 acres ii.

    Informal event may take place on the weekend and holidays at any time on at least 18 acres; but cannot take place more than 6 weekdays in any calendar month.

    Iii.

    No more than 7 minor equestrian events each year on a site of 25 acres iv.

    No more than 3 major equestrian events in one calendar year on a site of at least 75 acres with direct access to a roadway with an arterial or higher classification.

    Cannot take place for more than 3 consecutive days.

    Permits required, fee may be required.

    V.

    Maximum of 10 major and minor events each year at any equestrian facility vi.

    Event cannot be held on a site that does not have minimum acreage required.

    B.

    Minimum number of gross acres per horse: i.

    Two acres for 1-2 horses; ii.

    One acre per horse for 3-10 horses; iii.

    For more than 10 horses, an additional one-half acre per horse.

    C.

    Plan approvals and compliance: If more than 10 horses kept or boarded, facility must meet all nutrient management, water qualify and soil conservation standards of County and State.

    All of the above applies to facilities in agriculture zones (R, RC, LDRC, RDT, TS, RNC, and RNC/TDR).

    D.

    For residential zones, ANY facility on less than 5 acres must establish sufficient open pasture for care of horses and maintenance of facility through a pasture maintenance plan, feeding plan, and other documentation the Board requires.

    E.

    Setbacks: Each building, show ring, paddock, outdoor area, and manure storage area must be located at least 100’ from existing dwelling on an adjacent tract of land.

    F.

    Noise levels and Lighting: must comply with requirements of Code; cannot be major intrusion on nearby properties.

    G.

    Hours of Operation for Event: 6 a.m. – 9 p.m.

    Sunday through Thursday and from 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

    Friday and Saturday.

    H.

    Equestrian facilities in a residential zone must comply with all standards as established by the Zoning Board.

    PRINCE GEORGES – http://www.pgplanning.org/Resources/Zoning Information/Zoning Ordinance and Use Tables.htm (1) “Agriculture” uses may be permitted in V-L and V-M zones provided the proposed use: a.

    Preserves the agricultural land, open space, scenic vistas, and environmental features of the area; b.complements the natural characteristic of the area; and c.

    Does not detract from the Village residents’ health, safety, welfare, and enjoyment of the Zone. 11 (2) “Agricultural Land” shall mean all real property that is carried on the tax rolls of the Maryland State Department of Assessments and Taxation as agricultural; or all other land that is currently used for agricultural operations and has been used, and/or is under preparation for use as an agricultural operation continuously for at least 1 year. (3) “Agricultural Operations” includes among many uses, equine activities and equine facilities. (4) “Agritourism” includes “Equine Activities” and “equine facilities” Agritourism includes farm or ranch stays subject to the same rules as a Bed-and-Breakfast Inn as defined in the County Code. (5) “Equine Activities” includes teaching equestrian skills, participating in equestrian events, competitions, exhibitions or other displays of equestrian skills and caring for, breeding, boarding, dealing, selling, renting, riding, or training equines.

    The terms shall not include “Animal Boarding Place.” (6) “Equine Facility” includes barns, stables, rings, paddocks or accessory buildings or structures used for equine activities. (7) An “Animal Holding Facility” shall mean any commercial facility for the care, boarding, training, holding, harboring, or housing of any animal or animals, and includes but is not limited to, a riding school or stable. (8) “Domesticated Animal” means an animal of a species that has been bred, raised, and is accustomed to live in or about the habitation of man, and is dependent on man for food or shelter. (9) “Farm Animal” shall mean any domesticated species of animal commonly kept in proximity to, but not ordinarily housed in the immediate domicile or household of, humans, and used for agricultural or equine activities.

    Farm animals shall include, but not limited to, horses. (10) “Livestock” shall include (but not limited to) all domestic or domesticated equine animals.companion animals are not livestock. (11) “Private Stable” is any stable wherein the owner houses or stables only his/her own horse. (12) “Riding School or Stable” shall mean any place at which horses are boarded or displayed; or which the horses are available for hire or riding instruction or pony rides; or which regularly buys, sells, trains, or trades horses, ponies, donkeys, mules, or burros, including any thoroughbred racetrack, trotting track, or rodeo.

    No person may operate a riding school or commercial stable without a County riding school and stable license.

    An annual fee is applicable.

    Standards for riding schools and stables include: a.compliance with the minimum standards of the County Code.

    B.

    All animals shall be provided with daily food and water which shall be wholesome, palatable and of sufficient quantity and nutritional value, and free of any contamination.

    C.

    Shelter shall consist of an enclosure with at least 3 solid walls and a solid roof.

    All buildings and sheds used for stabling shall be well lit and ventilated and provide protection from extreme weather.

    D.

    All buildings and sheds used for stabling shall be kept clean and in good repair, manure shall be removed daily.

    E.

    Stacked manure piles shall not be allowed to stand for a period in excess of 4 days, except when weather conditions prohibit its removal, and in all instances must be kept at least 50’ from a building or shed housing animals.

    F.

    Stabling shall be graded and drained to prevent pooling of water; no open drains; no garbage, fecal matter or similar matter shall be allowed to remain in the stable or enclosure.

    G.

    Owner and operator of a stable shall be responsible for suppression of internal parasites, flies, and other insects attracted to the stable site. 12 (13) A riding stable may be permitted as a temporary Special Exception, if adjacent areas are predominately underdeveloped.

    A riding stable may be permitted in the V-L and V-M Zones, provided the proposed use complies with those of “Agriculture” uses. (14) A “Rural Entertainment Park” promotes entertainment and recreational opportunities in rural areas of the County.

    Permitted uses include indoor or outdoor riding arenas, trails, riding stables (with or without paddocks) QUEEN ANNE’S – http://www.ecode360.com/7137102 (1) “Agriculture” includes, among other activities, all methods of production or management of livestock. (2) “Agricultural/Equestrian Activities” include the care, breeding, boarding, rental, riding or training of equines and other farm animals or the teaching of equestrian skill and open houses, clinics, and demonstrations. (3) “Agricultural/Equestrian Events” includes competitions, exhibitions, or other displays of skills on private lands where an admittance fees is charged for spectators. (4) An “Agricultural/Equestrian Facility” is any private land area, building or structure used for an agricultural/equestrian event.

    A setback of at least 100 feet from an existing dwelling is required. (5) Outdoor arena lighting must comply with the regulations of the Code; depends on size, use, and location. (6) “Agricultural Employment” is recognized as any service or activity performed in connection with raising, sharing, feeding, caring for, training and managing livestock. (7) “Farm” is defined, in part, as a parcel or combination of parcels used for agricultural purposes. (8) A “Farm Building” is a structures utilized to store farm implements, hay, feed, grain or other agricultural or horticultural product, or to house poultry, livestock, or other farm animals.

    Cannot include spaces as a place of occupancy or habitat by the general public. (9) Within the Agricultural (AG) Districts, agricultural/equestrian activities and events are permitted uses. (10) The standards of the AG District permitted use for agricultural/equestrian events does not apply to 4-H, FFA, non-profit youth events, educational events and other agricultural/equestrian activities which do not charge for public attendance (other than audit fees for education purposes). (11) When an admittance fee is charge for spectators, no more than 10 agricultural/equestrian events may take place per calendar year.

    Overnight accommodations for spectators are prohibited. (12) Each event requires a permit limiting the event to no more than 3 consecutive days; a fee may be charged by the County.

    SAINT MARY’S – http://www.co.saint-marys.md.us/docs/CurrentZO.pdf (1) “Agriculture” includes activities related to the feeding, housing and maintaining of animals (including horses). (2) “Agricultural Tourism” are activities conducted on a farm, offered to the public or an invited group, for the purpose of recreation, education or active involvement in the farm operation. (3) “Animal Husbandry” requires all areas used or intended to be used for keeping and confinement of animals (including corrals, pastures, paddocks, pens, etc.) shall be enclosed by adequate fence or other device capable of securely containing and protecting the animals. (4) A “Bona Fide Agriculture Use or Activity” is any activity related to the feeding, housing and maintaining of animals. (5) An “Equestrian Activity” is the care, breeding, boarding, rental, riding, or training of horses or teaching of equestrian skills. 13 (6) “Equestrian Events” includes any competition, exhibition, or other display of equestrian activities. (7) An “Equestrian Facility” is any building or structure, or land area, used for an equine event or activity. (8) A “Commercial Stable” is defined as any stable housing horses, operates for remuneration, hire, sale or stabling, or any stable, not related to the ordinary operation of a farm. (9) A “Private Stable” is an accessory building for the housing of a horse owned by a person or persons living on the premises and which the horses are not for hire or sale. (10) Regulation of use for a “major” equestrian facility requires a site plan, a minimum of 15 acres, a setback of 100’ from all property lines for structures (do not need to be enclosed) of 30,000 square feet or larger.

    Evening and weekend operations permitted so long as they do not have a major impact on other adjoining uses. (11) Regulation of use for a “minor” equestrian facility requires permit approval, off-street and loading space provided, structures cannot exceed 30,000 square feet, and setback requirements depend on size of property. (12) Animal Husbandry activities permitted in RPD, RSC, RL-T, RL, VMX, and TMX districts (13) Equestrian Facilities (Major) conditionally permitted in RPD, RL-T, RL, VMX, and TMX districts. (14) Equestrian Facilities (Minor) permitted in RPD, TMX, and VMX districts; and limited permission in RL-T, and RL districts. (15) Stables (accessory buildings) permitted in PRD, RSC, RL-T, RNC, VMX, and TMX districts.

    SOMERSET – http://www.somersetmd.us/ordinances.html (1) “Right to Farm” legislation adopted into County’s Public Ordinances. (2) Feeding and watering of livestock may not have an impact on tidal waters; low impact grazing permitted. (3) All stables and equine facilities required to have a minimum of 2 acres for the first horse and an additional acre for each adult horse beyond 2. [NOTE – this is not written in the ordinances, but a

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    Shetland Pony : CLASS S430 MOST SUCCESSFUL EXHIBITOR IN SHETLAND PONY LED CLASSES….

    Equi.Linn panties - Equi.Linn sports Lingerie - For the Rider Horses-store.comShetland Pony : CLASS S430 MOST SUCCESSFUL EXHIBITOR IN SHETLAND PONY LED CLASSES….

    CLASS: S430 MOST SUCCESSFUL EXHIBITOR IN SHETLAND PONY LED CLASSES MRS C D BIGGAR & P T MC CORMICK GOULBURN NSW 2580 CLASS: 431 Shetland Pony Stallion or Colt, n.e. 8.2hh. MOOGULLY FARM PICASA WENTWORTH WILLOWS TAGGART SHANUSTI FURYS FIRECRACKER CLASS: 432 Shetland Pony Stallion, 4yrs & over, over 9.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. SHAMBALA PARK MATRIX GAR-WON RHEMA MILLBRAE KENYA MILLBRAE MEDALLION CRANELLIE JASPER LENTARA MEDIA CLASS: 433 Shetland Pony Stallion, 4yrs & over, over 8.2hh & n.e. 9.2hh. BLUE RIVER LITTLE BEAR REDACRES VISCOUNT CLASS: 434 Shetland Pony Colt, 3yrs, over 8.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. KEVELLE LEE KINTORE CLASS: 435 Shetland Pony Colt, 2yrs & under, over 8.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. PILINTA PARK SHOWMAN CRANELLIE ELGYN SHAMBALA PARK ZUMA CLASS: S436 CHAMPION & RESERVE CHAMPION SHETLAND PONY STALLION SHAMBALA PARK MATRIX GAR-WON RHEMA CLASS: 437 Shetland Pony Brood Mare. REDACRES MIA CRANELLIE YETTA CRANELLIE IMPORTANCE REDACRES MARGOT CLASS: 438 Shetland Pony Mare or Filly, n.e. 8.2hh. CLANLINE MERRYLEGS WANAMARA KATRINA WENTWORTH WILLOWS PSALM CLASS: 439 Shetland Pony Mare, 4yrs & over, over 8.2hh & n.e. 9.2hh. REDACRES VICTORIA CLANLINE SHADOW RITCHBURN MINETTE CLASS: 440 Shetland Pony Mare, 4yrs & over, over 9.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. CAREAL GEORGIA SHAMBALA PARK ISABEL GAR-WON HELINA REDACRES PAULA KEVELLE LEE KIRBY MULWAREE LANA CLASS: 441 Shetland Pony Filly, 3yrs, over 8.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. REDACRES MYFWANY REDACRES MELISSA SHAMBALA PARK DESTINY CLASS: 442 Shetland Pony Filly, 2yrs & under, over 8.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. PILINTA PARK OLIVIA CRANELLIE DIMITY REDACRES INDE CLASS: S443 CHAMPION & RESERVE CHAMPION SHETLAND PONY MARE CAREAL GEORGIA SHAMBALA PARK ISABEL CLASS: S444 JUNIOR CHAMPION SHETLAND PONY FILLY PILINTA PARK OLIVIA CLASS: S444CA The John Williams Memorial Perpetual Trophy, donated by Mr R Williams for the Junior Champion Shetland Pony Filly. PILINTA PARK OLIVIA CLASS: S445 JUNIOR CHAMPION SHETLAND PONY COLT PILINTA PARK SHOWMAN CLASS: S446 SUPREME CHAMPION SHETLAND PONY CAREAL GEORGIA CLASS: S446CA The Wells Perpetual Trophy, donated by the late H P Sleigh and Family of Turriff, Scotland, for the Supreme Champion Shetland Pony. CAREAL GEORGIA CLASS: S447 BEST OPPOSITE SEX TO THE SUPREME CHAMPION SHETLAND PONY SHAMBALA PARK MATRIX CLASS: S447A Sash for the Best Opposite Sex to the Supreme Champion Shetland Pony, supported by the Royal Agricultural Society of NSW. SHAMBALA PARK MATRIX CLASS: 448 Shetland Pony Gelding, any age, n.e. 9.2hh. REDACRES IKEY KEVELLE LEE FENWICK REDACRES CASSIUS CLANLINE TOUCHDOWN TON-LEA PARK NICHOLAS CLASS: 449 Shetland Pony Gelding, any age, over 9.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. FENWICK OTHELLO WOODVIEW KALIPSO REDACRES MARIO SHAMBALA PARK MIDAS FAIRFIELD PARK U KNOW CLASS: S450 BEST SHETLAND PONY GELDING FENWICK OTHELLO CLASS: 451 Group of Three Ponies by the same Sire or out of the same Dam. REDACRES VISCOUNT / REDACRES MELISSA / REDACRES MYFWANY MULWAREE KIANGA/ MULWAREE LANA/ CRANELLIE YETTA SHAMBALA PARK ISABEL/ SHAMBALA PARK DESTINY/ SHAMBALA PARK HUGO CLASS: 452 Shetland Pony Stallion or Colt and 2 Mares or Fillies, 2yrs & over; owned but not necessarily bred by Exhibitor. SHAMBALA PARK MATRIX/ SHAMBALA PARK ISABEL/ SHAMBALA PARK DESTINY MULWAREE KIANGA/ MULWAREE LANA/ CRANELLIE YETTA REDACRES VISCOUNT/REDACRES PAMELA/REDACRES PAULA/REDACRES VICTORIA CLASS: 453 Three Shetland Pony Mares or Fillies, 2yrs & over; owned but not necessarily bred by Exhibitor. REDACRES PAMELA/REDACRES PAULA/REDACRES MARGOT/REDACRES VICTORIA CRANELLIE IMPORTANCE/ MULWAREE LANA/ CRANELLIE YETTA SHAMBALA PARK ISABEL/ SHARPLY VALE QUEENIE/ SHAMBALA PARK DESTINY CLASS: 454 Shetland Pony Stallion CAREAL GREAT EXPECTATIONS MILLBRAE MEDALLION MILLBRAE KENYA CLASS: 455 Shetland Pony Mare or Gelding, to be ridden by a Child under 12yrs, as at the first day of the 2011 Sydney Royal Easter Show. FENWICK OTHELLO THORPEVILLE GEENA CRANELLIE ESQUIRE PENTLAND MARION OTWAY VIEW OREGON CLASS: S456 BEST RIDDEN SHETLAND PONY FENWICK OTHELLO CLASS: 457 Shetland Turnout, n.e. 10.2hh, not to be led.

    Rider to be under 12yrs. THORPEVILLE GEENA LERWICK XENIA OTWAY VIEW OREGON CLASS: 458 Shetland Turnout, n.e. 10.2hh, not to be led.

    Rider to be 12yrs and under 15yrs. THORPEVILLE GEENA CLASS: 707 Novice Shetland Pony Stallion. GREEN VALLEY KURRAJONG MOOGULLY FARM PICASA CLASS: 708 Novice Shetland Pony Mare, Filly or Gelding. CLANLINE SHADOW REDACRES PAMELA LERWICK XCEL CLANLINE MERRYLEGS WANAMARA SCOTTY CLASS: 709 Shetland Pony Stallion or Colt, over 8.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. CAREAL GREAT EXPECTATIONS FAIRLIGHT ACRES APACHE GREEN VALLEY KURRAJONG CLASS: 710 Shetland Pony Stallion, Colt, Mare, Filly or Gelding, over 7.2hh & n.e. 8.2hh. REDACRES BRONSON MOOGULLY FARM PICASA CLANLINE MERRYLEGS COLINA PARK GOLDEN BOY AKONEA KHAN CLASS: 711 Shetland Pony Mare or Filly, over 8.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. CAREAL GEORGIA KEVELLE LEE FALLON REDACRES PAMELA CLASS: 712 Shetland Pony Gelding, over 8.2hh & n.e. 10.2hh. REDACRES ROGAN SHAMBALA PARK MIDAS FAIRFIELD PARK U KNOW CLASS: 713 Shetland Sulky or Buggy Pony in Harness.

    Stallions are permitted to compete in this Class. GREEN VALLEY KURRAJONG CAREAL GEORGIA MILLBRAE MEDALLION CLASS: S714 CHAMPION & RESERVE CHAMPION SHETLAND PONY STALLION, COLT, MARE, FILLY OR GELDING IN HARNESS CAREAL GREAT EXPECTATIONS FAIRLIGHT ACRES APACHE CLASS: 715 Junior Driver driving a Shetland Pony Mare, Filly or Gelding.

    Driver to be over 12yrs & under 17yrs.

    All Junior Drivers MUST wear approved headgear.

    To be judged on the driving ability of the child. GREEN VALLEY BROOKE AKONEA JOANIE FRANCES CLASS: 716 Shetland Pony Sulky or Buggy Turnout.

    Stallions are permitted to compete in this Class. GREEN VALLEY KURRAJONG CAREAL GREAT EXPECTATIONS MILLBRAE MEDALLION CLASS: 717 Shetland Pony, Show Vehicle/Viceroy Turnout.

    Stallions are permitted in this Class. MILLBRAE MEDALLION FAIRFIELD PARK U KNOW LERWICK XCEL CLASS: 718 Shetland Pony Business Turnout to be driven either Single or Multiple.

    To be judged on Horse, Harness and Turnout.

    Stallions are permitted to compete in this Class. KEVELLE LEE FALLON CLASS: S719 CHAMPION & RESERVE CHAMPION SHETLAND PONY TURNOUT MILLBRAE MEDALLION GREEN VALLEY KURRAJONG CLASS: 720 Multiple Shetland Ponies (Pair, Tandem, Unicorn or Four in Hand).

    Ponies and Vehicles may be owned by different Exhibitors.

    Stallions are permitted to compete in this Class. AKONEA JOANIE FRANCES AKONEA KHAN

    Read more about Shetland Pony : CLASS S430 MOST SUCCESSFUL EXHIBITOR IN SHETLAND PONY LED CLASSES….:

    Equestrian Products – Guardian Horse Bedding, Equiderma Skin Products, Equilinn Sports Bra

    Other Sources:

  • Typing Games: Horse Racing Typing
  • Breeds of Livestock – Horse Breeds
  • Horse (zodiac) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • Equestrian Products – Guardian Horse Bedding, Equiderma Skin Products, Equilinn Sports Bra, Learn more about Equi.Linn panties – Equi.Linn sports Lingerie – For the Rider Horses-store.com HERE:

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    Horses-Store.com and Shetland Pony : CLASS S430 MOST SUCCESSFUL EXHIBITOR IN SHETLAND PONY LED CLASSES….

    Horses-Store.com - Shetland Pony : CLASS S430 MOST SUCCESSFUL EXHIBITOR IN SHETLAND PONY LED CLASSES….